Waste:

  Chas49 22:13 02 Oct 08
Locked

I already have a black wheelie bin for household rubbish, a green one for garden waste, a green box for paper and cans - now I see that we are to be issued with a white box for cardboard.

Where will it end - a very large box for the cars which some people (already finding it difficult to make ends meet) will dump? Though, from past experience, I think that the car will be the last thing to be dispensed with, and that's for sure!! How about a box for our old computers? The council could be seen to be benevolent when sending them to the poorer countries.

Enough, I'm beginning to get that Victor Meldrew feeling again 8-))

  peter99co 22:24 02 Oct 08

At least you have a recycle system. Some are still waiting.

We have a Green General Waste Bin,Brown Garden Waste Bin and a Brown/Greenlid Bin for Paper,Tins and Plastics. (on a two week cycle)

Before you had a Metal Dustbin but just normal rates. Now you pay council tax so you get THE WORKS.

  Chas49 22:46 02 Oct 08

Our Household waste bins are emptied every week (at the moment), the others fortnightly.

I would guess that those without recycle bins have councils who just cannot meet the expense of supplying them - or perhaps they don't see them being profitable.

I wonder what 95,000 white boxes will cost the rate payers in the Wolverhampton area?

How much profit is made on recycling the waste after deducting the cost of men and lorries - not to mention the initial cost of the bins and boxes. Our local council issue annual reports listing all the services and the cost of providing them - but I don't remember seeing a similar listing of the savings made by these 'special' collections.

I do remember the waste the council allow to happen each year - the reports are printed on glossy paper and are in the form of a brochure - well over £100,000 (one to each ratepayer) at least - probably more. It used to be copies on ordinary paper at one time and, of course, still passed the message. Ah! I've just twigged it - we are now a city! We have an image to uphold.

  spuds 22:51 02 Oct 08

After seeing a program on television last week, I wonder why we bother about sorting waste at the doorstep.

In that particular program it showed 'sorted' waste being mixed, and then dispatched to India, where it was disposed with no respect for the environment. Of course, when the responsible authorities were shown the evidence, shock, horror and alarm was the usual reply!.

Bit like all the old computer and IT equipment, that ends up in third world countries as scrap.

  Forum Editor 22:58 02 Oct 08

to the 21st century.

My father would smile if he could see me loading all my tree and bush prunings into a green waste bin - he and millions of others used to burn all that stuff at the bottom of the garden. The bonfire area was a magical place, and as a child I spent many a happy weekend afternoon and evening watching my father pollute the atmosphere. The more the fires smoked the better I liked it.

  Chas49 10:42 03 Oct 08

The comment by spuds about our sorted waste being sent to India reminds me that this country used to be the dumping ground for the rest of the world - remember the nuclear waste being sent here for processing? This is like sweeping dirt under the carpet - it may be out of sight but it still exists - problem solved for now - but it will, of course, return.

I have no doubt that fortunes have and are being made in both cases - do the makers of these fortunes care about long term effects on the general public - of course not! This is the way of the world I'm afraid.

Victor Meldrew - you have a lot to answer for! 8-)) ( I wish that they would rerun that series)

AS FE says: Welcome to the 21st century.

  spuds 10:53 03 Oct 08

If you look at most council's you may well find that they are one of the biggest offenders, but you never see many fines heading their way, complaints yes fines and criminal records no.

Why is it, that they always seem to think that they are in the right, and in some cases, trying to get them to change their views or practises seems to be a never ending task, usually with failure.

I think the "Do what we say, but not what we do" is becoming more appropriate nowadays.Perhaps we need more Victor Meldrew's and John Littlejohn's in our midst :O))

  Chegs ®™ 11:02 03 Oct 08

Call me cynical,but my view is that garden waste (grass cuttings/hedge clippings,etc)would more than likely kept for the compost heap by a gardener,whereas non-gardener types wouldnt even bother mowing the lawn so thats 1 less wheelie bin needed.We have fortnightly collections for the rubbish & garden waste thus we had little problem as one week was household refuse the following week garden waste.Then they introduced black boxes and now we have white bags and green bags as well as the box & 2 wheeliebins.The front of the fridge is now hidden behind so many timetables for these waste collections I've forgotten what its actual colour is. :)

  Cymro. 11:28 03 Oct 08

I have always had my doubts about all this recycling business although in our house we do tow the line and fill the necessary box with the right kind of waste.

I wonder just what is the carbon footprint of it all. With all the different coloured plastic boxes needing to be manufactured and delivered, then the brand new state of the art composting unit that have been built by some local authorities.

Surely the right place to stop all this waste is at the manufacturers that produce the packaging and at the shops that send us all home with a pile of wrappings that we don`t need and then have to get rid of.

Is it really necessary to sell soft drinks and the like in steel cans, aluminium cans, plastic bottles and some sort of cardboard carton. Whichever one of the above is the best for the environment should be the only one permitted for general use.

We all carry home more waste packaging than we ever did and very little is done to reduce the amount. Even the good old British milk bottle that we used to return to the dairy is disappearing fast. As children many of us have carted loads of glass bottles back to the shops for the few pence that was the deposit on the bottle.

  Chas49 12:20 03 Oct 08

'Surely the right place to stop all this waste is at the manufacturers that produce the packaging and at the shops that send us all home with a pile of wrappings that we don`t need and then have to get rid of.'

Unfortunately, no matter what kind of packaging is involved in order to retain our food - it really is necessary. We, as the end user, have to get rid of it. Cans, bottles, cardboard, paper, can and should be, recycled (makes economic sense to reuse materials where possible). In order for this to be carried out we need these containers (yet another form of packaging) in which to store the items for collection.

I don't like having so many containers but, on reflection, we can't have it both ways - either we save in separate containers or we dump it in one and have it sorted out by the council department involved - that, at the end of the day, would be very expensive and we, as ratepayers, would foot the bill.
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'Is it really necessary to sell soft drinks and the like in steel cans, aluminium cans, plastic bottles and some sort of cardboard carton. Whichever one of the above is the best for the environment should be the only one permitted for general use.'

Not necessary, but whichever method was chosen, and I would say that cardboard (like the milk cartons) would be my choice - you're talking legislation by those with the power to put it into effect - the manufacturers of the other means of packaging would rise in protest and the law subsequently squashed as big guns are brought to bear on their MP's.

Just look at the apparent hypocrisy where cigarettes are concerned - packets with warnings on them telling you of the dangers of smoking but legislaton against cigarettes will not be forthcoming as it is also provides a source of revenue. To stop the sale of cigarettes would provoke large protests from both manufacturer and end user. This is why I say apparent hypocrisy - it could be argued that the warnings are the most 'they' can do.

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