There's nothing geostationary about this move

  TopCat® 18:21 29 Oct 09
Locked

by Google when they "...announced a free navigation service for mobile phones that will offer turn-by-turn directions, live traffic updates and the ability to recognize voice commands..." click here

Expanding this service out to many more mobile phones will certainly guarantee more hurt to the already suffering GPS industry. Should be good news for the consumer though, I reckon. TC.

  Quickbeam 09:18 30 Oct 09

"Google said that the service might be supported by advertisements in the future. That would make driving directions the latest form of information to shift from being a paid service to one that is ad-supported."
Will that mean directions like 'turn right at the MacDonalds ahead, and then left at the KFC and it's behind B&Q' are on the way...?

I'm already considering swapping my phone & PDA for a smart phone using Google maps instead of a dedicated sat-nav, but will the ad-supported future on the Google service make a dedicated sat-nav a better proposition after all?

  wiz-king 12:00 30 Oct 09

I thought all directions were give by pubs or churches! It's a bit off when they rename the pubs, I get lost.

  Quickbeam 13:02 30 Oct 09

Before sat-navs, way back in the '90s, I used to stop at garages and newsagents and ask for directions in strange towns.

The one thing that I always did was when I realised I was completely on the wrong side of a town, was to stop listening to the detailed directions that I was being given, and just politely nod and thank the person I was asking, as would have forgotten after the first 3 turns where I was supposed to be turning. I'd then get to the right side of town and ask again!

I suppose that's another aspect of human interaction down the pan...

  anchor 13:39 30 Oct 09

I dread to think what the charges if you remain connected to the internet, (as you would have to be), on a long journey. Mobile phone rates are not cheap.

I will stick to my Satnav.

  Quickbeam 13:52 30 Oct 09

I don't think the data usage is too great for updating map positions.

Does anyone use one for long periods? And does it cause a problem with the 'fair usage' requirement in the small print?

  interzone55 15:16 30 Oct 09

"I dread to think what the charges if you remain connected to the internet, (as you would have to be), on a long journey. Mobile phone rates are not cheap."

Firstly GPS doesn't use any mobile data, secondly, many of these phones come with the maps pre-loaded now, so that won't involve data downloads either.

Even if you do download the maps, they don't require a massive amount of data, as they're mostly simple line drawings, and many of the Google Android are available on unlimited data tariffs now.

  interzone55 15:27 30 Oct 09

"Does anyone use one for long periods? And does it cause a problem with the 'fair usage' requirement in the small print?"

3G phone networks are essentially "always on" similar to an ADSL connection, and data for web pages and applications is pulled across the network as and when required, and a simple google maps page takes very little data as it's just a series of vector drawings...

  Quickbeam 15:53 30 Oct 09

Thanks for that, it seems they use less data than I thought for GPS mapping.

  Chegs ®™ 13:54 31 Oct 09

I'm considering buying a satnav but was interested in a smartphone system until I read that smartphones "can" be so slow at relaying the instructions(although this is improving)as to be verging on useless.Therefore I'll eventually buy a standalone satnav when I lose interest in interacting with real people or my map reading skills are thwarted by lousy signage such as Blackpools where there are clear signs along the promenade/seafront directing one to the motorway but very little if you stray off the route(avoiding a collision with a local motorist who loses patience with your slower progress and cuts you up)

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