Tell me if I'm wrong,......

  Forum Editor 11:09 03 Jan 16
Locked

but isn't this a pretty obvious thing to be doing? When I left my primary school it was the norm to expect that I should know my multiplication tables inside out and backwards.

Now, it's being hailed as an indication of educational excellence. To me, it's an indication of the need to get back to where we were decades ago.

According to the Labour party, in the past some teaching unions have warned additional tests can place unwelcome pressure on teachers and pupils.

Unwelcome pressure? Poor things. I'm fed up with teachers making excuses for educational failings - blaming it on someone else. Children will learn if they are taught well, and perhaps a bit more unwelcome pressure is called for.

  HondaMan 11:17 03 Jan 16

Sounds to me like a "dumbing down" of basic standards. You praise something to make it "special". We were expected to have our multiplication tables off by heart by the end of year 4 (in todays language) and even the remove forms were mostly expected to know them by the time they went to the then secondary school

I have a friend who was a moderator for one of the major examining boards, he left in disgust as markers were not allowed to take marks for basic spelling and grammatical errors like "their" for "there"; "could of" instead of "could have", or even as happened in some cases for spelling their own names correctly. The difficulty we, as a society face, is that many of the teachers know little better!

  Forum Editor 11:29 03 Jan 16

"The difficulty we, as a society face, is that many of the teachers know little better!"

A lot of people share your view. I'm one of them.

  Aitchbee 11:29 03 Jan 16

The automated 'on screen check against-the-clock', seems to me, to be a bit of a gimmick - something which would be better left to a proper primary maths teacher.

  Belatucadrus 11:33 03 Jan 16

Some years ago I signed up for a computing HNC at a local college, I was utterly gobsmacked when the first thing they did to the A leval graduates that had joined was to test literacy and numeracy skills and offer remedial clases for those that failed !

'#@$%.

I was like FE, the idea that kids could become A leval graduates without being able to spell or count did not compute.

  Flak999 12:16 03 Jan 16

I couldn't agree more, these standards of 'excellence' were the norm when I left school! I agree with FE and HondaMan there has been a dumbing down of standards.

  Quickbeam 12:48 03 Jan 16

Those were basic standards of maths that had an immediate use in the real workplace when you left school. Whether it was in a shop, a bank, a laboratory, a joiners shop, a pub as either a bar man or dart player or in my case in bakeries, you were expected to do that sort of maths quickly in your head without looking for a pen & paper!

  caccy 15:25 03 Jan 16

As well as the "Times tables" having to work in "£.s.d" helped many people with their numeracy.

  Aitchbee 15:38 03 Jan 16

As well as the "Times tables" having to work in "£.s.d" helped many people with their numeracy.

Too right! When I was a boy I was able to calculate the returns on my Mum's winning bookie lines ...doubles, trebles and accumulators ... no problem ;o]

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 16:16 03 Jan 16

Used to teach apprentices in the nineties, they all struggled with math out of school, I could do calculations faster in my head on on pare than they could using a calculator.

They didn't realise when their answer wa a mile out because they had put the decimal point in wrong. I taught them to "guessimate" so they then knew when they were wrong.

By the time their apprenticeship was finished they knew the tables and a few math shortcuts.

  bumpkin 17:30 03 Jan 16

Ok, if we are doing a bit of maths 0/1=0, 1/0 does not equal 0 but a calculator will say that it does, can anyone explain that.

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