So where are the refinery pickets now?

  Cymro. 15:57 15 Jan 11
Locked

Soon after Labour came to power in 1997 petrol was also considered to be very expensive. That was about the time we saw a blockade of oil refineries by largely self employed people such as haulage contractors, farmers and the like. I suspect many of these people were more likely to be Tory supporters than Labour.

So where are these people now?
I suspect that they were more than willing to take such action when they had a Labour government in power but not so willing to do so now that we have coalition government. At the time I had no sympathy with these people, so am I right to have even less sympathy for them now?

  WhiteTruckMan 16:02 15 Jan 11

probably running/ruining unions, getting others to do their dirty work for them.

WTM

  Cymro. 16:05 15 Jan 11

Please explain!

  Chegs ®™ 16:12 15 Jan 11

My guess as why nobody is going to blockade the refineries is possibly due the introduction of new laws giving the Police powers to remove protesters,and the lengthy prison terms handed out.The last time the refineries were blockaded,I ran a taxi business and my income was severely depleted as my cars had no fuel but I was in full support of the protesters.Were another protest to start involving blockades,I would join them as the present price of fuel is insane and due to rise again.The government aren't entirely at fault for the price,but they get two lots of "tax" from fuel VAT & fuel duty so they could reduce the taxation & thus the price per litre.

  Cymro. 16:18 15 Jan 11

So after you have cut the tax on fuel just where do you suggest the cuts in government spending are to be made to pay for the tax cuts?

  OTT_B 16:29 15 Jan 11

I'm not sure that fuel blockades would do much good at this point. If the actions from 2000 blockades were repeated in the same way then it wouldn't have any effect (the government would know the blockades would eventually dissolve, if necessary using fairly new police powers, and revoking operators licenses). The only way to have any effect at this point would be to make them permanent and impossible to police - effectively starving the country. That would be a wholly irresponsible thing to do.

The government, despite manifesto pledges, are under no requirement to drop fuel duty, and even if they did, the persistent increases in the cost of crude would soon wipe out any cuts. Cameron's comments of "sharing the burden" are all he needs to say to keep the vast majority of the public from taking part in any unrest.

  OTT_B 16:29 15 Jan 11

I'm not sure that fuel blockades would do much good at this point. If the actions from 2000 blockades were repeated in the same way then it wouldn't have any effect (the government would know the blockades would eventually dissolve, if necessary using fairly new police powers, and revoking operators licenses). The only way to have any effect at this point would be to make them permanent and impossible to police - effectively starving the country. That would be a wholly irresponsible thing to do.

The government, despite manifesto pledges, are under no requirement to drop fuel duty, and even if they did, the persistent increases in the cost of crude would soon wipe out any cuts. Cameron's comments of "sharing the burden" are all he needs to say to keep the vast majority of the public from taking part in any unrest.

  CurlyWhirly 07:58 16 Jan 11

"So after you have cut the tax on fuel just where do you suggest the cuts in government spending are to be made to pay for the tax cuts?"
------------------------------------------
How about cutting the overseas budget to countries like India, Pakistan and China as these countries are not poor any more like some third world African countries.

In any case 'charity begins at home' at least in my book it does.

  Quickbeam 09:25 16 Jan 11

Those fuel blockades at the start of New (but same old tricks) Labour's run of power contained large numbers of small and medium sized hauliers that united very quickly from a no known threat force, to a major thorn in the governments side.

The next time the price shot up the hauliers were more feared for the disruption that could be caused by a quickly organised unorganised force. So the Traffic Commissioners were cajoled into threatening all hauliers operator licences with suspension/permanent revokement of their operator licences if they were seen to be participating in any diruptive action. That was New labour's Peterloo moment that was kept quite.

  Cymro. 10:52 16 Jan 11

So am I too assume that you never ever give anything to any overseas charity then, or perhaps you just never give to charity anyway.
All heart some people!

  Cymro. 10:58 16 Jan 11

You could hardly expect any government to stand by and do nothing. If you are right then it seems to have solved the problem.

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