Russian Murderer

  Pine Man 08:44 17 Jul 07
Locked

Is it really as simple as it seems to me?

The UK is seeking the extradition of the Russian suspected of murdering Litvinenko.

The Russians explain that, unfortunately, Russian law does not provide for extradition to the UK so they cannot legally do it.

The UK appear to accept that extradition is not within the Russian constition but nevertheless continues to pursue it and now they are expelling four Russian envoys because the Russians still will not extradite the suspected murderer.

I am not, for a minute, condoning the murder of Litvinenko but am I missing something here?

  laurie53 09:08 17 Jul 07

I must admit I too find this puzzling.

It is against the law to extradite Russian citizens, but the UK government wants the Russian government to breach their own law.

Many spent lifetimes trying to persuade the Russians to set up such constitutional laws, and now that they have we want them to dump them.

The Russians are no strangers to state ordered deportations (yes, I know there's no comparison) and we should not blame them for being wary of such a move.

  newman35 09:29 17 Jul 07

Also puzzled.
Why did we refuse to allow him to be tried in Russia?
Surely we cannot think that their justice system would not be as honest as our own?
Once we had seen their trial, then would be the time to make any complaints.

  MichelleC 10:44 17 Jul 07

I think the whole crux of why we want him extradited is for the European Community to get Putin to show support for the whole process of bringing criminals to justice in the country in which the crime was committed.

If a crime was committed in the UK and the criminal fled to, say, Spain they would agree to send them back here. This measure of support applies to vertually every European country. Although Russia isn't in the EEC it is a European country, and diplomatically one would expect that same support to extend to them. But Putin has refused, and there were suggestions (allegedly)that at some stage he himself was involved in the ordering of eliminating Litvinenko.

If the criminal was tried in Russia, perhaps the trial would not be as open and fair as it would be if conducted over here, mainly because the Russians have now reverted to being as secretive and underhand as they were before Gorbachev brought perestroika to the Soviet Union.

Russia is vertually now run by their Mafia, and politically they are no longer far left but could be considered to be far right in the extreme.

This situation of a breakdown in diplomatic unity is slightly worrying because in the future we would probably need Russian and all their resources more than they would need us in the EEC.

  newman35 10:56 17 Jul 07

Agree with your thoughts, in the main, but my feeling would be that if Russia was allowed to 'try' their own man the world would see the openess (or lack of) and react accordingly.
Russia would be in the position of having to prove their system - let them.

  Pine Man 10:57 17 Jul 07

'I think the whole crux of why we want him extradited is for the European Community to get Putin to show support for the whole process of bringing criminals to justice in the country in which the crime was committed.'

I couldn't agree more with this comment but why are the UK, having found out that extradition is not permitted under the Russian constitution, still pursuing that aim and not looking for options that might be agreeable to the Russians?

'If the criminal was tried in Russia, perhaps the trial would not be as open and fair as it would be if conducted over here'

But surely that is a British view and clearly not shared by the Russians?

Russia, I believe are happy to consider a trial in Russia once evidence has been made available to them.

'we would probably need Russian and all their resources more than they would need us in the EEC.'

I know this shouldn't be a consideration but it is really isn't it?

  Kate B 11:17 17 Jul 07

Point of information: first, it's the EU now, not the EEC; and second, Russia isn't a member of the EU and so is under no obligation to abide by any EU rules or expected standards of behaviour.

The crime took place on British soil against a British citizen, which is why Britain wants to try the alleged murderer in Britain. There's no reason to try the alleged killer in Russia.

It's a worrying situation - relations haven't been great between Europe and Russia recently anyway, and this won't help, but I think the government needed to send a strong message to Moscow about how seriously it takes first the killing and second the refusal to send the prime suspect to the UK.

  spuds 12:10 17 Jul 07

Perhaps 'Cold War' tactics and the insurgent of world powers are re-emerging?.

  spuds 12:15 17 Jul 07

"There's no reason to try the alleged killer in Russia". Doesn't the UK still have a similar problem with Libya?.

Then what happened about the London death of a dissident by umbrella lethal injection?.

  newman35 13:14 17 Jul 07

Wasn't the Libya comment possibly about the Lockerbie bomber who had to be tried at Camp Zeist in the Netherlands - albeit in a Scottish court. Wasn't that due to Libya not wanting to send him over here for trial?

  spuds 13:19 17 Jul 07

Did I state that Georgi Markov's death had any thing to do with Libya. I was thinking of two other 'incidents', which are still hitting headline news. Shooting outside an embassy and a plane crash perhaps!.

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