'Right to be forgotten'

  rdave13 23:02 15 May 14
Locked
Answered

EU stepping up again with new rules for search engines. One link here to what it will mean to Google. Obviously it will mean the same to the others.

Personally, a search engine being forced to delete history, no matter what, by a EU ruling, is breaching my human rights. No one should be allowed to 'frigg', by want of a better word, what has acctually happened in the past, pertaining to relations to anybody or historically. Whether they have served a sentence or have been found innocent or anything else is irrelevant. The information should be there. It has happened and should not be censored.

I demand it.

Otherwise I'll be moving to China. They're looking good for a better internet experience.

  carver 01:31 16 May 14

It seams that one ex MP and a paedophile have asked for info about past misdeeds to be removed enter link description here.

I for one do not want history to be deleted if it may save a child in the future.

  fourm member 10:43 16 May 14

From what I've read this looks like another one of those very complicated issues.

The law says that some things from a person's past can be 'forgotten'. For example, some criminal offences become extinct and there is no obligation to disclose them.

So, Mr. A, applying for a job, perfectly legally does not mention a spent conviction. The potential employer searches online and finds the local paper report of the case from all those years ago.

The court seems to have been trying to bring the online situation in line with the real world.

It's hard to know where the balance lies. Has the court gone too far because the judges don't understand the electronic world? Or is Google making a big fuss because it might have to do some work?

  Mr Mistoffelees 11:17 16 May 14

My understanding is that search engines will be expected to remove references to information people want to forget, not the information itself, simply making it harder to find.

  Quickbeam 11:47 16 May 14

I've always been easily forgotten, so no probs for me.

By the way, I'm Quickbeam...

  mbc 12:28 16 May 14

---and I am Spartacus

  wiz-king 13:32 16 May 14

And I am Mr/Mrs/Ms A.N.Onymous.

  Mr Mistoffelees 14:15 16 May 14

And I am a conjuring cat, a twitch of the tail and poof, I am gone!

  wee eddie 14:20 16 May 14

Just because a particular Search Engine does not link to an item, does not mean that it has disappeared, it just means that, if one is lazy one will not necessarily find the answer.

In other words we are back to where we started.

If you want to know the answer, it will be necessary to view the original source material, rather than listening to gossip which is basically what the Search Engines have, of late, become.

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 16:42 16 May 14

I don't have to tell my insurance company of my speeding convictions if they are more than 4 yrs old.

Fine paid. points expired!

This ruling appears to be of a similar nature, or am I reading it wrongly.

  rdave13 16:53 16 May 14

fourm member, 'some criminal offences become extinct' and that is fair enough if just a minor offence. Luckily we do have the DBS in this country.

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