Retirement and working. Taking jobs....?

  lisa02 15:11 05 May 07
Locked

On one hand I have friends who are unemployed and there is not much in terms of work going in our area.

On the other hand I have colleagues who boast "I don't need this grief I have more than enough pension coming in" when they are confronted with a bit of pressure.... "Lucky you" is my normal response.

Why don't they step down and let some else who needs the job more have it?

What's your view?

  lisa02 15:13 05 May 07

Just emailed FE asking him to move this thread.

  spuds 19:04 05 May 07

" Why don't they step down and let some else who needs the job more have it?"

There can be many reasons to that question.

(1)That little bit of extra 'spare' money can help out a lot with a pension, irrespective of what the person may think or say.
(2)Boredom of not being occupied and perhaps not mixing with other people during the day.
(3)A way of keeping fit, physically and mentally.(4) Working after retirement date, can earn extra credits on the pension given, plus there are other tax incentives available.

  Phphred 19:51 05 May 07

How about tax incentives for not working when on a pension and giving those who need a job the opportunity to have one

  oresome 20:05 05 May 07

I'm retiring next month at the age of 59. Anyone who wants my old job is welcome to it!

As you get older, time becomes more important than income in my view. I was made redundant at 54 and then spent a year getting a low grade job.

There are usually jobs out there, but you have to swallow your pride and take what's available once over a certain age.

On the plus side, the low wage has got me accustomed to living frugally, so retirement will come as no great shock income wise.

I must admit to being a little apprehensive......after all, I've gone to work every day for the last 43 years and my time has been spoken for.

  Totally-braindead 20:11 05 May 07

My brother retired early. He has a part time job as an accident investigator for an insurance company, sometimes he gets a job a month, sometimes he gets 5 or 6. Theres no way anyone could live on this part time income which varies so dramatically so hes not doing anyone out of a job.
I did discuss it with him just before he retired and asked what he was going to do. His opinion was that he had enough money to live on, albeit not in the lap of luxury, life was too short to work all the time and he didn't feel personally it was right for him, given the circumstances to take a full time job away from someone who might really need it. And as another point there wasn't really anything he absolutely loved doing.
He spends his time enjoying himself and why not, hes earned it.

  laurie53 20:42 05 May 07

Do not be apprehensive, I got up every day for half a century, and thoroughly enjoyed my job (first forty years in the forces, plenty of variety etc).

I don't miss it one bit, not from day one. The social life and crack maybe, but the work not at all.

Enjoy it

Laurie

  spuds 22:33 05 May 07

Like everything, there is a learning curve which you soon get use to, depending on your needs and requirements. I found the first two years in retirement difficult, because I previously had a very active work and living style. After the 2 years things become 'normal'.

Enjoy your retirement, but watch the taxman :O))

  Kev.Ifty 23:21 05 May 07

This retirement thing is 'B S' in my opinion.


I have recently lost one of my best engineers because he reached his 65th birthday.

  Jak_1 13:10 06 May 07

Why should they step down just because someone else is looking for a job, they will have their own reasons for continuing working!
Just because they moan is no excuse for them having to leave because someone else would like their job now is it. Those who are seeking work should be looking elsewhere.
Spent 18 months looking for work 12 years ago and ended up moving 200 to take up a job. Extreme maybe but I was then in work and earning a wage instead of relying on a job maybe becomeing vacant in an area of low job availlability.
I have since retired but will be looking to get a part time job later in the year to bring in some extra funds.

  Forum Editor 13:19 06 May 07

of someone who retired, only to suffer an almost immediate crisis of health? How many times have you met/seen an ex colleague some time after his/her retirement and thought 'blimey! he/she has gone downhill'?

I believe that if you can keep working, and you are still getting some satisfaction from it, then you will be better for carrying on as long as possible. Work, and the mental activity that goes with it are good for both mind and body in my opinion, and I certainly intend to carry on for as long as people will pay me.

I could have sworn I heard groans of dismay as I typed that last line. Must have been dreaming.

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