Recycling policies

  exdragon 14:58 17 Oct 07
Locked

Could someone tell me why there isn't a country-wide agreement on recycling, please?

In my neck of the woods, we have a small black box for newspapers, glass, tins, batteries, trainers, clothes, aerosols and various other bits and pieces, a small brown cannister for kitchen scraps with a larger one to decant it into, an edict to place loose cardboard under one of the other bins (and the collectors will retrieve any which blows away...) plus the normal wheelie bin for everything else. You're on your own with all plastic bottles and such like.

I've just come back from holiday, where there were just 2 wheelie bins, one for paper, cardboard, all plastic bottles etc and tins (definitely no glass) and the other for everyting else.

If it's so important for my area to do it their way, how come somewhere else can do something so simply?

And I do know it's probably up to each Council to make up their own rules, which isn't really the answer to my question!

FE - please feel free to delete this at source if you wish, I guess I'm just haveing a bit of a rant.

  JanetO 15:34 17 Oct 07

I think each council is monitoring others to see which system works best. I hear one council is supplying free colour-coded plastic rubbish bags, enough for each household for 1 per week. Any more that are needed can be bought for 28p.

  paul€ 15:51 17 Oct 07

One large wheely bin for general waste

One large wheely bin for plastic and cardboard

one large wheely bin for compost house and garden waste

One large box for glass and all cans.

one large box for paper.

One large bag for disused clothing.

These are emptied every fortnight.

The local recycling center has dedicated bins for batteries, oil, electrical goods etc.

It's getting to the stage that less than half of the large general waste bin is filled every fortnight. This compares to an overflowing bin every week.

Trouble is, will we get to a stage were recyclers don't want anymore. Could it reach overcapacity?

  PalaeoBill 16:09 17 Oct 07

Because we have local government.

Each council has different resources at its disposal (land fill sites, incinerators, etc.) and they all have to meet government recycling targets or suffer fines/funding cuts. So they have all had to design and implement their own schemes to achive this within a budget.

It would appear to be the ideal service to centralize and handle nationally but that would be too sensible. One in siz of us is now a civil servant. They have to have something to do.

  spuds 16:23 17 Oct 07

There appears to be no set pattern as to what council's decide. I live within a quarter mile boundary area of three council's, not one of them have the same scheme as their neighbouring area.

The council that covers my address, provide one wheelie bin (replacements about half the size of the original supplied bin) for most household rubbish, and one small plastic box for paper,plastic and glass.The next council provides two small wheelie bins, one for most household rubbish, the other for glass, wood and paint!. The third council still provides three bin liner type bags per household, and everything is put into the refuse lorry.

We use to have three general public tips, that would take anything. Not now since contractor's took the running of the sites over. Everything is sectioned, and you have to make sure everything is put in the right place. Ask the contractors to assist, and its a case of sorry "Health and Safety. We might injure ourselves, then we may have to sue you" How nice.

  Cymro. 16:31 17 Oct 07

What I have always wondered about is why can`t some one figure out what are the best materials to use as containers for such things as drinks.

You can get soft drinks and beer in all sort of containers such as glass bottles recyclable and non reciclable, tin cans, aluminium cans, plastic bottles, tetrapaks etc. etc.

Surely some one can find out which is the best for the environment and then the government can make the best container the only one to be used.

The best answer to waste disposal is to start at the source of the waste and that is at the factory and the shop. There is no way that we really need so much packaging materials.

We seem to bring as much waste home from the supermarket as actual food ant it is just so unnecessary.

  Brumas 16:47 17 Oct 07

I think we should consider ourselves pretty fortunate here in the U.K. that an effort is made to recycle all manner of things. The ‘residents’ of Smoky Mountain in Manila would relish the opportunity of not being dependent on the large scale ‘lump-it-all-together’ method.

  exdragon 16:51 17 Oct 07

Yes, I never quite got the hang of why we are going to have to start paying to dispose of packaging which we never really wanted in the first place. I recognise, of course, that some produce can hardly be flown across continents without some sort of protection!

I know I can go across the road and buy a cauliflower which will be put in a paper bag (or my recycled plastic one!) but I still have to go somewhere else for the rest of my shopping.

  exdragon 16:51 17 Oct 07

Yes, I never quite got the hang of why we are going to have to start paying to dispose of packaging which we never really wanted in the first place. I recognise, of course, that some produce can hardly be flown across continents without some sort of protection!

I know I can go across the road and buy a cauliflower which will be put in a paper bag (or my recycled plastic one!) but I still have to go somewhere else for the rest of my shopping.

  exdragon 16:51 17 Oct 07

Finger slippage

  Jak_1 17:03 17 Oct 07

In Manchester we have 4 wheelie bins, a grey one for general rubish,a blue one for paper, a brown one for bottles and a green one for garden waste (Japanese knotweed is is not allowed in any of the bins) and a plastc bag for tins. You end up nearly all week just sorting out rubish! Im' all for re-cycling but not when it starts to take over your life!

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