Postage Paid Via Ebay/Paypay?

  Quickbeam 11:06 AM 22 Sep 11
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Does anyone know if it's cheaper to do it yourself via the Post office online payment & printing system. It's just that I've started to clear out some clutter items on Ebay and a friend said that using the PO directly is a fair bit cheaper.

  gengiscant 11:17 AM 22 Sep 11

I don't think there is really much difference, I must admit I have not used PayPals system I have used Royal Mails online system and unfortunately have had problems. Even though I have a very good set of scales, on occasion the post offices scales showed a different weight. I later discovered that the PO scales are not checked or calibrated as often as they should be.So something to look out for, it will be their scale weight they will charge you for not yours even though yours might be more accurate.

Back to your question there seems little point in doing it online as you still have to take it to your local PO where it is again weighed and you are given proof of postage.

For bigger items I use Parcel Monkey who will collect same day,provided you are reasonably early to book and who's prices are very good. Better than parcel2Go who I have found to be unreliable.

  Woolwell 11:22 AM 22 Sep 11

Fairly certain that for a private user it is not cheaper to use online. Franking can be cheaper but there are ongoing costs and you need to have a large mail run. I regularly send out large quantities of post and use Smartstamp but there is a monthly cost of £5 so it isn't cheaper but more convenient. There is no point on doing it on-line if you want proof of postage.

  Woolwell 11:23 AM 22 Sep 11
  Quickbeam 11:28 AM 22 Sep 11

The PO scales; yes, I had to buy some stampage this morning for that reason, it seems easier to add a 100 grammes and live with it!

The PO is only around the corner from me so that's convenient anyway, printing the postage label and paying at home is more convenient that faffing around at the counter with multiple packets.

On the plus side, I've pulled in nearly £800 this week by offloading stuff I no longer use!

  Quickbeam 11:32 AM 22 Sep 11

"There is no point on doing it on-line if you want proof of postage."

With the Ebay/Paypal system it prints a second certificate of posting that has it be initialled and stamped at the counter. I would assume that the PO method uses the same.

  Aitchbee 11:42 AM 22 Sep 11

Off the beaten track here, but today on the bus I got talking to two young postmen, they had their Royal Mail bags up on the seats at the back of the bus.They said that they were new to the job.They may be asked to deliver up to 8 bags a day.One of them also said that Amazon parcels now outweigh(sorry for pun)all of the letters etc. that they deliver.I know their bags were heavy, as I lifted one, from one seat to another.

  onthelimit1 11:51 AM 22 Sep 11

Ghengis - thanks for the tip on Parcel Monkey. My wife is about to sell a load of bric-a brac on line, and PM looks like a great way to transport the items when sold.

  Woolwell 11:58 AM 22 Sep 11

The certificate of posting needs to be date stamped and signed at the post office so you might as well use their full facilities. If you don't want a certificate of posting and you are not using recorded delivery, or special delivery, etc then with online you print your label and put it in any post box.

  spuds 12:05 PM 22 Sep 11

While there might be easier methods of sending items from eBay auctions, I would always suggest that you obtain a certificate of posting or confirmation of despatch, for your own and the buyers safeguard.

Nothing like have a query about non-delivery and a bad feedback?.

  Quickbeam 12:21 PM 22 Sep 11

On the other hand, the Ebay receipt is linked to the sale item/value, so if 1 item out of a hundred is lost, there would be more credibility in the event of a claim. Right...?

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