PC Advisor cover disc - devils advocate

  jorel 20:37 26 Jan 07
Locked

Tongue firmly in cheek here I am going to be the Devils Advocate :) The PC Advisor cover disc featured the Encyclopaedia Britannica this month, but to install it you have to register online (nothing new in that). However, the installation code depends entirely on people being a registered PC Advisor site user and becoming a user if they are not already. Do you think that is an acceptable way for them to increase site user membership and do you think that requirement should be mentioned in the magazine?

  rdave13 20:55 26 Jan 07

Can't see a problem with it. "Britanica" free if you register with two sites. Doesn't mean that you have to use either of them.

  Kate B 22:22 26 Jan 07

Not an issue for any of us, obviously, but I think it's annoying - people don't like being forced to sign up for things and it would stop me installing it. I often don't bother with websites that want to know everything about me for the privilege of wandering around it.

  rdave13 22:55 26 Jan 07

Knowing both sites well, they only ask you for your email. Nothing else. This is a legitimate selling tactic and is fair as you get the "britanica" reference free for that information. A

  rdave13 23:01 26 Jan 07

To carry on, as last post posted itself!,allowing your emails to both these sites gives them a chance to advertise their wares. Unlike unprofessional sites you can un-subscribe at any time. Seems fair to me.

  jorel 23:48 26 Jan 07

Rdave13
I agree that getting the Britannica free for giving your email to the site is not too much to ask. My main point was the fact that they used the free software to increase the online membership, whether or not people want to subscribe. After all, there is no need for membership of PC Advisor online to be a requirement; a requirement which is not even mentioned in the magazine - naughty in my opinion. In a couple of places in the magazine PC Advisor proudly boasts that "online membership is over 200,000" or "join 205,640 members online". I was wandering if those figures could be misleading considering many of them register with PC Advisor online purely for the registration codes.
Kate B, I am with you all the way on not bothering with websites that want to know my personal details. I have a Hotmail address which I use for sites that ask for my email, which I clear out once a week without bothering to read any of the mail. I use it purely for website email address requests.

  Totally-braindead 00:57 27 Jan 07

jorel you say "PC Advisor proudly boasts that "online membership is over 200,000" or "join 205,640 members online". I was wandering if those figures could be misleading considering many of them register with PC Advisor online purely for the registration codes."
I would agree with you if I could recall of another instance of this. I did not know you needed to be a member and as far as I know this is the first time I have seen this. I register software I think I might use but have never had to join the Forum to do this. It must be new.

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 14:12 27 Jan 07

What has most annoyed me about registering EB is the amount of Spam I'm getting from them (about 7 per day) even though I did not sign up for any newsletters. and unrgistering for e-mails has actually made it worse not better.

  Kate B 14:21 27 Jan 07

I keep an email address specifically for registering on websites.

  rodriguez 14:40 27 Jan 07

I also have 2 Hotmail accounts - one for everyday use such as MSN and another one to use for job applications and when registering with websites.

  IClaudio 19:50 27 Jan 07

Eee, when I were a lad, me Mam paid 1/- a week for the Encyclopeadia... and you worry about a few e-mails? You don't know yer born...

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