one for your eyes

  sunnystaines 16:38 18 Aug 10
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click here

must say i find middle vision the most troubling.

  Pineman100 16:57 18 Aug 10

I'm short-sighted and astigmatic. At my age (67) I need to wear bifocals for just normal everyday stuff.

But I also have a special pair of computer specs, that were suggested to me by my optician. They're bifocals, too, specially prescribed so that the upper part of the lens is exactly right for the distance that I sit from my computer screen, while the lower part is set to my reading distance for documents on the desk beside me.

They're wonderful, and I'd recommend the idea to any specs wearers who also use a computer regularly.

  jakimo 17:37 18 Aug 10

Having worn glasses for 48 years (varifocus\photo-chromatic and tinted) my optician just this month tells me that my long vision has improved so much that I no longer need glasses for distance reading.

Does anyone know of anything else that may improve as you get older?

  morddwyd 17:55 18 Aug 10

My taste in women!

When I think about the air heads I fancied as a teenager, compared with the more sophisticated and chic objects of my admiration now I am older.

I have no doubts the earlier air heads feel the same about their taste in blokes!

  morddwyd 19:46 18 Aug 10

Anyone who uses video display equipment as an integral part of their job is entitled to free eye tests, and they should be taken up.

You should also move away from the screen for at least five minutes in every hour.

One of the biggest problems, which I suffered from myself, is tilting the head back slightly to view the screen, particularly those who wear normal bifocals.

This puts a strain on the neck/ shoulder muscles, and can also affect the blood supply to the brain, and therefore the optical system, causing blurred vidon and headaches.

  ams4127 19:54 18 Aug 10

Same age and exactly the same problems as your good self. Next time I visit the optician I will mention that idea - it sounds brilliant.

  Dragon_Heart 23:02 18 Aug 10

If you need glass's ONLY for PC work at work they should also pay for them !

  BT 08:30 19 Aug 10

I think you'll find that if you have free eye tests for VDU use at work that the employer will also provide the specs in much the same way as they supply prescription safety specs if required.

  morddwyd 09:15 19 Aug 10

The employer not "will" provide, but "must" provide!

However, it is not quite so simple as it first sounds.

The spectacles must be certified by an optrometist as being specifically required for VDU work, and not for much else.

For instance, most people who wear reading glasses also need to wear such glasses when using a VDU, but they do not qualify for free provision.

I must have carried out hundreds, probably 1,000+ if you include annual reviews, VDU Workstation risk assessments and can only remember two or three such cases of the employer having to pay for spectacles.

  BT 16:55 19 Aug 10

I suppose a lot depends on the employer.

We were required to wear Safety Specs at all times, and although plastic 'overspecs' were available my employers were quite happy to pay for prescription safety glasses, with whatever extras were required. i.e. Varifocals, Bifocals, anti reflection coatings, tints, etc. When I asked the H&S manager what we could have he said "Whatever you have on your own glasses."
And although I'm not sure about VDU specs I'm sure they would have provided these as well, considering how much they spent on Prescription Safety specs, and as much of our time was spent operating process computers via touch screen VDUs.

  Pineman100 18:30 19 Aug 10

Having read your post about your taste in women, I strongly suspect that your blurred vision and headaches have nothing to do with your computer use!

;o)

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