Not serviceable

  spuds 12:01 30 Jun 10
Locked

Why is it that we are seeing more items that are 'Not Serviceable', when they go wrong. In some cases it could be the most simple and inexpensive part that as failed, yet the item is destined to the bin.

Years ago before the so called new recycling came into being, most items were easily repaired, but not any longer.

Some 'Not Serviceable' parts can cost as must as the original item, so bin for an otherwise good item, because the hassle of repair is just not feasible or time warranted!.

  Quickbeam 12:37 30 Jun 10

"most items were easily repaired, but not any longer."

About 10 years ago I overhauled a Suffolk Colt petrol mower. I did it because I wanted to, but the cost of reboring, a new piston, a new carb, a new cord start, welding the splits in the roller new chain and sprockets was well over the cost of a new petrol mower, and I didn't take the labour cost into account or repaint with new transfers to make a real restoration job. It's just easier to go to B&Q for another when they break.

  jack 13:34 30 Jun 10

Is the culprit of course
I still have an original Chrome on Brass Russel Hobbs Auto Kettle
That kept going for 20+year simply because little packets of spares were available 'Off the peg'
But when a 'Kettle can cost as little as £1 to make in No.1 Kettle Factory, any town China - making spares is not a feasible marketing option.

Some years ago a leather swivel Recliner[ made in China] had the weld on the pivot snap. - The Co-Op department store sent in a couple 'Furniture Inspectors'[ An out side organization] Authorized the repair and nominated a firm to do it.
Nothing happened - got onto Co-Op[who by this time were in process of closure]- And they authorized a refund plus bonus for my trouble
Meanwhile contacted the 'Repair Firm' direct who informed me - no spares available.
So I stripped said chair-took the appropriate parts to my local garage- who welded it whilst
I waited.
Something the furniture repair firm would have been able to organize-I would have thought.
But as always very few organizations will 'Think out side the box- because perhaps there are so many regularity issues constraining them- or is it plain idleness?

  jack 13:34 30 Jun 10

Is the culprit of course
I still have an original Chrome on Brass Russel Hobbs Auto Kettle
That kept going for 20+year simply because little packets of spares were available 'Off the peg'
But when a 'Kettle can cost as little as £1 to make in No.1 Kettle Factory, any town China - making spares is not a feasible marketing option.

Some years ago a leather swivel Recliner[ made in China] had the weld on the pivot snap. - The Co-Op department store sent in a couple 'Furniture Inspectors'[ An out side organization] Authorized the repair and nominated a firm to do it.
Nothing happened - got onto Co-Op[who by this time were in process of closure]- And they authorized a refund plus bonus for my trouble
Meanwhile contacted the 'Repair Firm' direct who informed me - no spares available.
So I stripped said chair-took the appropriate parts to my local garage- who welded it whilst
I waited.
Something the furniture repair firm would have been able to organize-I would have thought.
But as always very few organizations will 'Think out side the box- because perhaps there are so many regularity issues constraining them- or is it plain idleness?

  jack 13:37 30 Jun 10

Two for the price of one - sorry

  TopCat® 15:02 30 Jun 10

Yes, it definitely is a throw away society now where for the sake of a small part or two, an otherwise workable item has to be discarded or hopefully recycled.

I recall when my former company used to occasionally convert brand new Ford tractors into rail goods wagon pusher types for the major china clay mining company here in Cornwall. The end result was a tractor with four same size wheels, four wheel drive and a large flat-faced pusher blade at the front and rear, with supporting framework. Some of this framework attached to a very much stronger cast iron sump below the engine block. The original, lighter cast iron sump had to be removed of course.

We had accumulated about forty of these 'old' sumps which were perfect, as new and worth several thousand pounds. I contacted Ford with a view to returning them and was told to smash them up for scrap, as they couldn't interrupt their computerised progamme to include them!

This was back in the seventies and 'just in time' computerised deliveries to vehicle manufacturing plants was well underway. TC.

  Chegs ®™ 16:02 30 Jun 10

I have always kept broken items as I can cannibalise them for repairing their replacements(might require filing,bending etc)but am finding items like watches often cannot be salvaged as the old watch has a spring-loaded pin & the modern watches have moulded plastic.I was bought a watch by my daughter(very nice watch & quite expensive)that suffered a cracked glass.I took it to a jewellers for repair and was told to bin it as there was little likelihood of finding a repairer.I bought another watch(again quite expensive)and a few years later,the metal pin in the strap broke.Back to the shop where purchased and was informed that replacing the pin was going to cost more than twice the purchase price,so I rummaged through my stash of old watches and with a little tweaking by pliers,successfully repaired it(only for its battery to expire and the replacement by the shop was again more than the watches original cost so eBay provided me with a stash of that type of battery for a £1)

  ronalddonald 16:20 30 Jun 10

Why because the manufactures know they can charge us more money for replacing a part plus labour charges, joke isn't it not like the god old days when you could strip a machine down locate the fault and just get the component.

  sunnystaines 18:13 30 Jun 10

repairs may be back soon cheap goods in china may come to an end soon as more workers strike for larger increase in wages. many companies are now moving out of china to SE Asia to avoid raising costs in china.

why is it goods made in western europe are good quality but as soon as the company relocates to china the quality goes down hill and the goods become shoddy and just do not last.

  morddwyd 19:58 30 Jun 10

It's mainly because labour costs are so much higher than the simple cost of spares.

I can remember one particular set of circumstances.

A replacement seal in a sub-assembly cost 9 pence.

A replacement sub-assembly complete cost £25.

We always replaced the complete sub-assembly because labour costs to fit the 9 pence seal were £60.

It's simple economics.

  jack 07:53 01 Jul 10

replacing a single component in a unit that has had long service is almost certainly a recipe for another failure within the unit if not total shutdown because of the disturbance of disassemble and putting together again.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Nintendo Switch review: Hands-on with the intuitive modular console and its disappointing games…

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

Method Studios' title sequence for BBC series Taboo is truly unsettling

Best Pages for iOS tips | How to use Pages for iPad & iPhone: 7 simple tips to get more out of…