Mindless Anti Social Behaviour

  bremner 17:59 26 May 10
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Never ending legislation hasn't helped.

"Safer Neighbourhoods" and PCSO's have had little or no effect.

We are likely to have less policeman for the foreseeable future.

How do we / the government stop such behaviour.

  Forum Editor 18:07 26 May 10

in this incident..."

An increasingly common denominator.

How do we stop such behaviour? We don't, but we can drastically reduce the incidence of anti-social behaviour quite simply - by bringing up our children to have respect for their environment, and for other people.

It really is as simple as that - give your child a decent set of moral standards and he/she will not go around vandalising the neighbourhood and/or exhibiting aggressive behaviour.

Too busy thinking about yourself to bother with your own children? Then society will continue to suffer from loutish behaviour.

  spuds 18:17 26 May 10

"How do we/ the government stop such behaviour"

Perhaps return back to the old days. A job,conscription,work in the community, a good old chastising, people looking after their own community without fear of prosecution due to human rights or grey area laws.

Here's a few choices. Abso's definitely do not work,court's are rightly criticized for some of the sentences passed, late night or open all day licensing, cheap easy to obtain booze and drug's.

The victim's should be considered more than perpetrator of crime. The solutions are endless!.

  onthelimit 18:38 26 May 10

If the 'old days' were the '60s, I used to be pretty scared by Mods and Rockers etc. Every generation seems to have a section who are totally antisocial.

  Forum Editor 18:40 26 May 10

It really isn't necessary - today's world is a better one in hundreds of ways. All we need to do is take the time to bring our children up to understand that they have social responsibilities, and that there's more to life than 'me first'.

In order to do that we have to think that way ourselves, and therein lies the rub, as they say. Many of the people who are the parents of today's children were not themselves provided with a decent set of standards to live by. They grew up caring only about themselves and their own gratification, and they've passed that way of living on to their children...and so it goes on, unless society as a whole decides to break the circle.

It can start with good government, but it can't end there - we, the people have to decide that we'll change our society for the better, and we have to start with our children. They are blank canvases,and they'll learn by watching the way we behave. It's not rocket science, but it requires an effort of will.

  spuds 18:49 26 May 10

Surely people have been using the same hymn sheet, when it became a crime for teachers to raise their voices to a child.

  Forum Editor 19:04 26 May 10

It's a question of perspective.

If parents brought their children up to respect people in authority teachers would be less likely to need to punish. The arguments for and against physical punishment go on endlessly, and we need to get over that - it's no good allowing teachers to reprimand children if the response from the children is likely to be an torrent of obscenities. Primary school teachers have a fair chance of instilling some values, but their examples must be reinforced by parents when the kids are at home, and quite often that doesn't happen.

Once children reach adolescence without a reasonable set of moral values the damage is largely done - they will test every boundary presented to them, and if they know that their parents will take the easy option and turn up the volume on 'Britain's got talent' the battle is lost before it begins.

It isn't the job of teachers, or of the government to bring up our children - that's our responsibility, and it's one that is often largely abdicated. Lots of parents seem to think that it's someone else's task to instil some sense of social responsibility into their children, and as long as that attitude prevails we stand no chance. You can't legislate for good behaviour, it must come from role models, and parents can be the most influential of those - for good or bad.

  Chegs ®™ 09:48 28 May 10

I agree with the FE,many years ago I recall a very young child who lived nearby who used foul language all day.As soon as he was old enough,he landed up in jail.He now has a family,and his son is exactly the same in school,swears at everyone and has been excluded for his behaviour.I often wonder just how many generations will this family take to realise that society will not accept their behaviour.

  ronalddonald 12:31 28 May 10

bring stronger penalties where shopkeepers are fined in thounsands and forced to close shop for a couple of days.

that would hit their profits and teach them to sell to under 18's

  ronalddonald 12:34 28 May 10

may be we should bring back the classic wash the mouth with soap and water

  Cymro. 12:57 28 May 10

when he says
"Too busy thinking about yourself to bother with your own children? Then society will continue to suffer from loutish behaviour"

"Perhaps return back to the old days."
"It really isn't necessary - today's world is a better one in hundreds of ways. All we need to do is take the time to bring our children up to understand that they have social responsibilities, and that there's more to life than 'me first"

"If parents brought their children up to respect people in authority teachers would be less likely to need to punish"

As I have said myself on this forum, today's society is exactly what we have made it and we must be willing to take the responsibility for the state it is in and I certainly don`t believe the so called "good old days" were anything like as good as they were made out to be.

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