Microsoft V Motorola

  rdave13 21:41 PM 23 May 12
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Another patent 'war' erupts with a possible threat to the X-Box.X-Box banned?.

Now another giant is involved, Google buys Motorola. Whatever happens I suppose it's the customers that eventually pays the cost for these lawsuits.

  Aitchbee 22:28 PM 23 May 12

I don't give a hoot.

  Woolwell 22:42 PM 23 May 12

AitchBEE - If you don't give a hoot then don't post. Meaningless posts are irritating.

Paying for lawsuits has to come out of profits/income. Profits come from the customers. So the customer pays.

  Forum Editor 22:54 PM 23 May 12
Answer

"Paying for lawsuits has to come out of profits/income. Profits come from the customers. So the customer pays."

Actually the shareholders pay - or rather they don't receive.

Products have to be priced competitively, so consumers will buy them. A company can't simply hike selling prices in order to offset the costs of legal battles. Those costs do impact on company profits, and therefore on shareholder dividends - they don't directly affect consumers.

  Woolwell 22:56 PM 23 May 12

FE - Of course you're correct and I should have known that.

However there must come a time when the large shareholders will say enough is enough.

  wiz-king 06:11 AM 24 May 12

Many of these cases are settled out of court - it's a game of bluff where both firms know that neither of them will 'win' and they are strutting their stuff to gain maximum profit with minimum loss.

  spuds 09:39 AM 24 May 12

wiz-king

And at the same time, legal companies are making large amounts of money in these type of cases, which of cause, someone as to pay?.

Off subject, but I still recall the Kodak DX3700 camera saga, and how the legal people (from both sides of the pond), and the UK Trading Standards dealt with that?.

  rdave13 09:49 AM 24 May 12

I'm puzzled that these big companies, with their legal teams, continually use other patented apps this way. Do they knowingly do it, knowing that there will be a law suit, and at the final settlement, whether out of court or not, they get a guarantee of permission to use these patents? Possibly just applying to use these patents would result in refusal and take time?

  spuds 10:45 AM 24 May 12

"guarantee of permission to use these patents?"

The world's an expanding place, and I think that you might have the answer from perhaps China?.

  interzone55 11:04 AM 24 May 12

I think the fault ultimately lies with the US Patent Office, which will issue patents without checking.

Kodak have now started to use the courts as a source of revenue, but this week a Judge ruled against Kodak in a case against RIM (Blackberry) and Apple, as the Patent in question was invalid on the grounds of "Obviousness"

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/22/applerimkodak_patents/

  finerty 20:27 PM 25 May 12

woolwell what is your going concern over this issue, do you have shares or some kind of monetary interest?

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