Loft insulation grant-workmanship

  JanetO 10:41 06 May 09
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I obtained a grant from Southern Electric for loft insulation for my mum. The surveyor said the guys were allocated half a day to lay it but as they used two men it would take 2 hours. I went out for an hour and found out they'd been and gone and mum had signed the approval form. When I inspected the loft it looked like they'd just thrown the thick fibreglass stuff all over the loft. There's no way you can go up there now because all the joists are completely covered. I requested an inspector who came yesterday and he declared that's how the insulation is done nowadays and all was well.

It'll be nice and warm in the winter but now I've got to organise boards to be laid if the loft is to be used. I must admit I'm a bit surprised they didn't do that as well.

  jack 10:43 06 May 09

Insulation- how you use the loft space is up to you.
So now you will have to go to a DIY shed and get an armful of boards.

  Toneman 11:06 06 May 09

Think the point is the depth of insulation now recommended is about 10 inches, far more than the thickness of usual ceiling joists, so the insulation is over the joists themselves. If you want board on top you would have to ensure, somehow, that it did not compress the insulation...

  interzone55 11:16 06 May 09

So you've had the insulation done for free, but also expected them to board the loft as well - that's asking a bit much.

Get down to B&Q and buy some loft boards...

  OTT_Buzzard 11:22 06 May 09

Sounds about right - the nsulation is ,way thicker than the depth of the joists.
The downside to boardng it is that you end up compressing the insulation which in turn squashes out all of the air. That means it will no longer be as effective.

  OTT_Buzzard 11:22 06 May 09

Sounds about right - the nsulation is ,way thicker than the depth of the joists.
The downside to boardng it is that you end up compressing the insulation which in turn squashes out all of the air. That means it will no longer be as effective.

  oresome 16:30 06 May 09

Many people are now experiencing condensation in the loft following an insulation upgrade.

It's important to maintain ventillation from the eaves which is easily blocked with 250mm of insulation layed.

  JanetO 17:12 06 May 09

..So you've had the insulation done for free, but also expected them to board the loft as well - that's asking a bit much...

Cheeky bugger. This is a government grant for pensioners over 70. Its purpose is to improve the life of a pensioner, that part of our society which are probably feeling the pinch now more than most. A lot of them are finding it hard enough to feed themselves, let alone anything else. So the gov have given them a few crumbs of the festive table (yes, MP's want more money too). But the job which gets done to my mind isn't really fit for purpose.

Yes, I'll go and get some boards. Are you going to help the other 30,000 pensioners?

  john bunyan 17:31 06 May 09

I paid someone to put 5" x 2" sawn timber at right angles to the cross beams, at the width of loft chipboards, then put the "free " extra insulation between them, re laid the insulation , then put the boards on top so the extra insulation was not compressed. This, and the winter fuel allowance, is the first tme I have ever received anything from the taxpayer .

  skeletal 17:38 06 May 09

As ever, without seeing exactly what has been done it is a bit difficult to give definitive advice. However, I would expect any job like this would be undertaken on the basis that “The men” will be told to do half a dozen houses a day (or whatever) and their job is only to provide extra loft insulation. If they chuck the stuff over all and sundry, including the cat if it got up there, then that’s tough, job done in ten minutes, off to the next one.

I’m not saying whether this is right or not, just how it is!

But on to the bit that’s worrying me. I would expect (and you indicate) that there will be a much thicker layer of insulation up there now, and it will be laid crossways across the joists, with, I expect, existing insulation lying between the joists.

Just how do you propose to put boards up there? It is not as easy as you think. If you intend to walk over them, and store moderately heavy stuff up there, you can’t just put the boards on top of the insulation. This is for two reasons:
1. They will compress it and as others have said, will reduce the effectiveness;
2. There is a danger that any weight on the boards will press down, via the insulation, on to the plasterboard of the ceiling below. This may result in damage to the ceiling.

If you only intend to put a couple near the loft hatch, and store a few empty boxes up there, you may get away with it.

To do it properly, you would need to put supports down to the loft timbers, through the insulation, and place the boards on top of the supports. This will take the weight, and not compress the insulation. This is a pretty advanced DIY project and to do it would be much harder than doing the insulation! Apologies if you/someone you know is a builder and knows all this!

Skeletal

  al's left peg 18:40 06 May 09

We have had a radio advert on today saying that a "specialist vehicle" will be driving round with infra red cameras pointing at houses, to see how much heat we are losing through our walls and roofs.
Surely it would be better to do this in the winter whilst everybody has their heating on?


JanetO, If you board out the loft it does reduce the efficiency of the insulation. I think it can be as high as 30%.

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