Kids get ipods for eating healthy food.

  Pooke 17:11 28 Jun 05
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Seems like a pretty good idea to me, I would have loved that at school.

What's your thoughts?

  Kate B 19:19 28 Jun 05

Ah, bribery - brilliant, always worked for me when I was a kid. Still, they didn't have iPods when I was a kid ...

  Elyse 22:08 29 Jun 05

makes me wonder why i ever paid for my ipod if its so easy to get one these days.

  De Marcus 22:41 29 Jun 05

I wonder if my 2 year old daughter will appreciate an ipod for eating her greens, she's more than welcome to mine if she has a go, mind you back when I was a sprog a slap across the hiney usually done the trick, ah, the good ole' days.

  jerichobob 20:34 30 Jun 05

What's the problem? I get beer for putting up shelves!!!! I know which I prefer. :)

  GANDALF <|:-)> 20:36 30 Jun 05

Two words...parental+responsibility.

G

  Forum Editor 21:40 30 Jun 05

the world's gone mad, but part of me says that as far as healthy eating goes the end probably justifies the means. On balance I'm for this scheme if it produces a positive result - children with some better ideas about what they should really be eating.

It's probably too late to rely on their parents to set any kind of example - these kids are at secondary school.

  Pooke 23:12 30 Jun 05

Indeed they reckon the cost of the scheme overall is less than it would cost to treat the kids for obesity related diseases in their adulthood. I wonder how many kids will continue to eat their greens and healthy food after the scheme ends?

  Forum Editor 23:35 30 Jun 05

who is over 60 years old, and will not touch salads. Whenever we dine together I go for a salad - which I love - and he opts for a meat/cheese based dish if he can. He won't touch fish or seafood, and I can't get enough of either.

We've talked about it. We both went to old-fashioned Grammar shools, where the education was excellent but the food was lousy.

BUT........

I grew up in the country, we had a massive plot of land, and my father was a keen gardener - he grew tons of vegetables and salads, and we ate all of them from an early age. My brothers and I were trout fishing when we were ten or eleven years old, and we brought home dozens of them - my mother could have written a book - '101 ways of serving trout'.

My partner grew up in a city, his father's hobby was playing cards, his mother worked hard, and he never went fishing in his life. They had no garden at home. He ate hardly any salad as a child, and he says his father wouldn't have fish on the table.

Eating habits are acquired at a very early age, and they stay with you - unless you make a conscious effort to change. As you grow up you can certainly enjoy foods you hated as a child - some of the more exotic cheeses for example, and the dreaded 'greens' - but unless you take action (or someone else does) bad habits are usually there for life.

  wiz-king 07:00 01 Jul 05

After a few months of eating all that rabbit food, winning an ipod the you breakit and this happens click here Oh well thats life.

  Elyse 19:02 01 Jul 05

LOL to the above poster. That's why i bought a dell -- people can say what they want...but i'm not joining this silly ipod revolution.

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