Internet bullies, another suicide, what can be done.

  bumpkin 15:24 07 Aug 13
Locked

I read in the news of a 14yr old girl killing herself after being targeted by so called Trolls, not the first either. What satisfaction do these sickos get from their behaviour. Will they be proud of themselves if and when they grow up.

I wonder what if anything can be done about this and the perpetrators punished.

  woody 15:30 07 Aug 13

"I wonder what if anything can be done about this "

Parental responsibility might be helpful. The first time you see bullying on the PC - they do monitor what their kids are up to? - they can help their kids to understand and/or switch off.

  wiz-king 15:35 07 Aug 13

The only way is to make all users of social media sites use their given name and address on the site and to restrict login by making the password only available to the user by snail mail. Even then people will move etc so you would have to make them change the password yearly the same way.

  bumpkin 15:43 07 Aug 13

" they do monitor what their kids are up to?"

I fear that a lot of them don't or don't know how to but you have a valid point.

  john bunyan 16:20 07 Aug 13

Where a "troll's" post is of a criminal nature (eg a physical threat, criminal libel ,calculated to make a reasonable person frightened) I think the police should treat it in the same way as a face to face threat. Sites should , by law, have to identify the culprits, and an industry code of practice brought in to ban them from the internet - say a year for first offence and increasing the ban to unlimited for re offenders.The sites make a lot of profit, so fines against the site may be appropriate, but unenforceable if abroad, so another sanction, such as denying UK access may have to be found.

  john bunyan 16:21 07 Aug 13

Where a "troll's" post is of a criminal nature (eg a physical threat, criminal libel ,calculated to make a reasonable person frightened) I think the police should treat it in the same way as a face to face threat. Sites should , by law, have to identify the culprits, and an industry code of practice brought in to ban them from the internet - say a year for first offence and increasing the ban to unlimited for re offenders.The sites make a lot of profit, so fines against the site may be appropriate, but unenforceable if abroad, so another sanction, such as denying UK access may have to be found.

  john bunyan 16:23 07 Aug 13

Sorry for double post. Had an error on first so thought it had not gone...

  bumpkin 17:43 07 Aug 13

A couple of interesting ideas from wiz-king and John but how to enforce it I see as a problem.

  bremner 19:18 07 Aug 13

John Bunyan

A teenager living in Englandin is abused on a website based in the Ukraine by another teenager living in Australia.

Who investigates the crime?

  morddwyd 19:34 07 Aug 13

"A teenager living in Englandin is abused on a website based in the Ukraine by another teenager living in Australia.

Who investigates the crime?"

The same person who does it here, the person in charge of the site.

Ck, so the scale is different, but it's not exactly quantum physics is it?

  john bunyan 20:13 07 Aug 13

bremner

And your suggestion to curb it is? My point was aimed at UK trolls, but as morddwydd says, much could be done - even Interpol in extreme cases, or stop sites who do not police themselves from having access to the UK.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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