Indian call centres are great.

  Blackhat 17:21 31 Mar 11
Locked

Not.

Latest to move are Yell 118 247 call centres.
click here

There have been many threads here citing issues with Indian call centres so I wonder how 118 will be in the future.

Already I get 1 or more calls a day for a recruitment agency called Seetec as one of my companies is close to their offices and is called C-Tech, short for Conservatory Technology Ltd. All these calls originate from 118 enquiries.

I know there are financial implications involved and also the training is intense but I feel it is a step backwards for a very often used service.

  Uboat 17:35 31 Mar 11

jesus its getting worse! day by day in the uk? the thing is from a business point of view the cost's involved in running a business here in the uk is just ridiculous its just Tax Tax Tax.! Period

from a item that starts on a conveyor belt in a factory to the finishing product it could of been tax'd several times from additional components to the import tax, the goverments ALL deserve what they get & its the same as the petrol prices they wont reduce the tax so more and more businesses are closing due to the overheads its costing to keep their heads above the water.

  Blackhat 17:59 31 Mar 11

It doesn't take much to ask for Seetec Recruitment, although based on the conversations I have with these callers they mostly seem to have great difficulty in understanding that they have called a wrong number.

  ukpostcode 19:05 31 Mar 11

Have a friend who runs an outsourcing company and it seems a few companies that have moved to India are wanting to move back to the UK as customers prefer talking to a UK based person.

I don't really care where the person is as long as they sort my problem out or get the problem sorted quickly!

  AL47 19:25 31 Mar 11

i called hsbc the other day, [sunday and late] im pretty sure that was indian, but the guy was very fluent and i could understand perfectly,

a few years back i called dell, that was a different outcome, she was horrendously bad at english.


but id rather have the 'out of hours' indian centres than none at all, and i think its a lot better now

  oresome 19:28 31 Mar 11

Not when they are constantly contacting you and are not governed by the telephone preference service.


Made me smile last week when I told the guy I was happy with my present supplier.

Oh Mr Oresome, he said, I am not selling you happiness, I am saving you money.

  morddwyd 20:18 31 Mar 11

The last Indian lady with an almost impenetrable accent I spoke to was at a call centre in Edinburgh.

  Grey Goo 21:30 31 Mar 11

Well I must always get the odd 1% that call me up

  citadel 21:50 31 Mar 11

I had a call about my broadband from the bt one. the girl just could not comprehend that I only have the phone for very light use and did'nt want the extra stuff. must not have been in the script and she slammed the phone down.

  DippyGirl 23:16 31 Mar 11

As morddwyd has alluded this has little to do with the location of the people who you talk to on the phone (scripted or otherwise] ...they are just doing their job
Its to do with the people who set up the process, and what the rules of engagement they set down.
But you pay peanuts (any location) you get monkeys!

BUT Dell are (IMO ) really very very very poor (I have pals who have the opposite view (but for them all went smoothly)

Mostly of the systems (computer or people ) work well all is good
When either fail ... the last thing you want is a script - therein lies the problem

  Forum Editor 23:59 31 Mar 11

The last Scottish lady with an almost impenetrable accent I spoke to was at a call centre in Bristol.

You and DippyGirl have made the point very well - it matters little where people are, provided they do the job. My experience is that the problems arise when call centre workers are terrified to depart from the inane script that they're forced to follow.

Get someone off the script and into normal conversation and you're halfway there. I recently spoke to someone at my bank's call centre, and it was a revelation - I actually found myself enjoying the conversation. Why? because the person at the other end started talking about - you've guessed it - the weather. It was small talk, but she turned a mundane banking enquiry into a pleasant business and social point of contact - it's what you need, but few companies seem to get it.

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