If ever there was an astonishing technical achievment

  Forum Editor 23:43 13 Nov 14
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  wee eddie 00:17 14 Nov 14

I have been thinking: Dangerous, sometime it comes up with results.

The fact that it bounced and returned to the Comet suggests that there is a little gravity.

My suggestion would be to use the last energy reserves, either the harpoon or the drill, to push it back into space. Hoping that the weak gravity might bring it back to land in a different place. Possibly to a position that would allow the lander to recharge.

Little loss, but possibly a considerable gain

  hzhzhzhz 01:14 14 Nov 14

I agree,FE. Fantastic.

  BT 08:04 14 Nov 14

wee eddie

There is indeed a tiny amount of gravity. The scientist on BBC Breakfast this morning said that the lander weighs about 100kg on Earth and weighs about 1 gm on the comet. The comet is also a lot bigger than I imagined, someone yesterday said its about 3 miles long.

What I'm surprised at is the fact that the comet looks to be composed mainly of rock when we have always been told that comets are big lumps of ice.

Fantastic achievement.

  morddwyd 09:19 14 Nov 14

"My suggestion would be to use the last energy reserves, either the harpoon or the drill, to push it back into space. Hoping that the weak gravity might bring it back to land in a different place. Possibly to a position that would allow the lander to recharge.

Little loss, but possibly a considerable gain"

It appears they can still get a vast amount of data with it in its current, less than optimum, position.

They are going to extract this, and then maybe chance their arm at repositioning, when, as you suggest, the loss will be minimum.

I liked the comment of the female scientist, when asked about the negative aspects replied they were having "too much fun with the data they already have"!

There speaks a true scientist. If that's her idea of fun you might have difficulty deciding what to do on a date!

  Quickbeam 10:09 14 Nov 14

It's truly amazing.

I can't help but think how many other planetary lifeforms in the whole universe might have advanced to outer space exploration since the big bang.

Can we really be unique? Can anybody hear me? Is there anybody out there? Or have the non-believers become too comfortably numb to the possibility...?

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 10:24 14 Nov 14

Great achievement - lots to learn - but sometimes you are subject to "luck" good or bad.

  spuds 10:52 14 Nov 14

"Can we really be unique? Can anybody hear me? Is there anybody out there? Or have the non-believers become too comfortably numb to the possibility...?"

Have faith that man, look how many millions of people have watched ET from its first release to even now, with the possible believe of something 'out of the normal'.

  kad292 12:22 14 Nov 14

From the first animals in space to Rosetta it has been an adventure and in less than a century a great deal has been achieved.Branson's failure should not dissuade him just as the failures and tragedies in the space programme have not ended the quest for space.

  amonra 17:09 14 Nov 14

Think of all the maths required to calculate velocities, positioning, and all the other misc. odds and ends; it's truly remarkable. All down to an apple falling off a tree a few hundred years ago. This ranks as one of man's best efforts, good luck to the probe.

  carver 18:06 14 Nov 14

When you sit down and think about it, it was only 111 years ago that we actually made the first heavier than air flight and just look at what has been achieved in such a short time.

And now we have computers that fit in the palm of your hand after less than 80 years, I am talking about something we would recognise as a computer.

It's just a pity I shall not be here to see the next 50 years.

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