Idiotic rules over photography

  interzone55 10 Oct 11
Locked

Man questioned by police for photographing his daughter

A man was approached by shopping centre security, and then questioned by police, for taking photographs of his daughter at an Ice Cream parlour in a shopping centre.

Apparently they have a No Photography policy to "protect the privacy of staff and shoppers", which is rubbish as the place will be crawling with CCTV, so the only place you'll get privacy is the toilets.

  Aitchbee 10 Oct 11

If the man had asked one of the staff at the ice-cream parlour if it was ok to take a couple of snaps then I think there would not have been any problem.

I always ask shopkeepers and pub/restaurant staff if it is ok to take a photograph. 9 times out of 10, they say it's alright to do so.

If I am on holiday, I usually buy some souvenirs, then with the shopkeepers consent take lots of souvenir pictures for my photo album.

  Terry Brown 10 Oct 11

Maybe I am missing the point, but if it was wrong to take a photo of your own daughter on the grounds that it may be published on a web site, surly it 100 times worse for the BBC to publish it on their web site where thousands of people can see it.

I can understand the need to protect young people, however as these were her own parents, and there was no way the photo could be use to abuse the child, rather that the child (and her parents) has a happy memory (sorry is that wrong!), where is the harm.

If that is the case, I look forward to thousands of cases (Solicitors rubbing hands together (like Vultures)) from sites like Twitter and Facebook.

Terry

  interzone55 10 Oct 11

AitchBEE

Why on earth should it be necessary to check with other people if it's OK to take a photo of your own daughter???

  bremner 10 Oct 11

It is clear that he was spoken to for taken a photograph. The subject of the photograph was not the issue.

This and many other shopping centres have clearly stated no photography policies.

Really a non story.

  Aitchbee 10 Oct 11

It only takes a second to ask permission - the fuss might have been avoided.

A couple of years ago I said to my friend that I was going down to my old primary school to take some nice photos for old times sake.My friend said it was not a good idea as it might have been misconstrued that I was a pervert. I decided not to take any photos.

If you are in a public place it's always better to ask permission.

  Pine Man 10 Oct 11

'If you are in a public place it's always better to ask permission.'

Who can you ask permission from to take photos in a public place? Surely you mean in a private place to which the public have access?

  Aitchbee 10 Oct 11

Pine Man - no, I mean what I say. I have learned that asking for permission to take a photograph is always the best policy.It's no big deal.

  john bunyan 10 Oct 11

Quite rightly our local Leisure Centre requires one to have written permission to photgraph (eg my grand daughter getting some gold medals) as there have been cases of perverts using mobile phone cameras in the mixed changing rooms.

  Pine Man 10 Oct 11

I have no issue with asking permission BUT if you are in a PUBLIC PLACE who do you you ask?

If you are stood in The Mall taking a photo of your child in front of Buckingham Palace who do you ask permission from?

The whole point of my post was to suggest that surely you meant a private place place where the public have access then you could ask the owner etc for permission.

  Aitchbee 10 Oct 11

fourm member - I respect your opinion, but I don't understand it.What am I doing wrong here? Common sense must prevail here. While I was in London last week, I took many photographs (outside) of all the tourist attractions without asking anybody for any permission, even the armed policeman at the locked gates at Downing Street. Thousands of people were taking photos.

At the Dominion theatre it would have been illegal to take any photos of the Queen Musical. So I didn't.

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