identity theft

  boots2 10:01 03 Mar 07
Locked

I have just seen another breakfast TV article about identity theft suggesting that you should not let others people know your address age and date of birth .
Is it just me thinking that it’s the instant credit that companies give that should be more responsible, and check the people they give credit to live where they say and are contactable at there work if necessary.
It just seems to me there should be list of details and checks required for credit .
Most people I know have those details my address book is full of them.

  Jackcoms 11:53 03 Mar 07

"should not let others people know your address age and date of birth"

If you don't let "others people" (sic) know your address how would you receive any mail?

  Alan H E 12:19 03 Mar 07

I think the trouble comes when they are openly displayed on sites like U tube, friends reunited etc. You can evidently keep them private. You just say for instance, I was born in early 1944 & don't give the exact date.

  spuds 12:26 03 Mar 07

Its an impossible world if someone, somewhere doesn't have all your details.

Whatever precautions are taken, there will always be someone who can and will obtain information about you,if they so wish, legally or otherwise.

  Cymro. 13:12 03 Mar 07

I am not too sure how these things work, but I hope it is the banks and such like that

would stand the loss if some criminal or other had managed to get money out of our accounts.

But even if that is the case there is still the hassle of having to sort it all out.

Something that can take a great deal of time and trouble.

  Forum Editor 13:37 03 Mar 07

"I hope it is the banks and such like that
would stand the loss if some criminal or other had managed to get money out of our accounts."

Not if the bank discovered that you had acted carelessly with regard to your login details - that would be your fault.

In practice it's very difficult to break online banking security checks, and in the vast majority of cases the account-holder succumbed to a phishing email. Provided you never provide any personal details in response to an email, no matter how official it looks, and provided you never store login information on your computer your online banking account will be safe.

  Cymro. 14:38 03 Mar 07

I dare say it is much the same as insurance companies not paying out for a stolen

car if you have left the key in the ignition. Your own fault so no pay out.

  Forum Editor 14:54 03 Mar 07

Yes, although I think the banks have to accept the fact that if they want to drive us all into internet banking (and they do) they'll see some hiccups along the way. In the main I believe they understand this, and I think they're reasonably helpful when someone loses money.

As time goes on they'll become less helpful, however, on the principle that we've all had enough time to learn about the potential risks.

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