ID cards rethink...

  Quickbeam 07:54 07 Mar 08
Locked

click here It seems obvious to me that the information on passports and driving licences is the same basic info that the ID cards require, have they just noticed this...?

It seems to me the only people that should need an ID card are non-drivers and non-travelers.

  johndrew 10:28 07 Mar 08

`It seems to me the only people that should need an ID card are non-drivers and non-travelers.`

Or those here illegally????

  crosstrainer 11:27 07 Mar 08

I have no problem with the concept, it won't stop identity fraud, in which case it will become a taxpayers nightmare.

HMG have proved themselves IT incompetent, and this could open a whole new can of worms.

  johndrew 16:24 07 Mar 08

I have a major problem with the concept; not only for the fact it will not stop identity fraud but may even increase it. Additionally the very people that should be controlled (if that is the right term) by the introduction of such a scheme will be the first to exploit it illegally.

We need to control our borders properly and only let in those who genuinely need to be here. We do not need scroungers, nere-do-wells and criminals. We have enough of our own.

I do agree that HMG have far to go before I believe they should be trusted with any IT system. Demonstrably their security and technical prowess leaves much to be desired.

  DieSse 22:14 07 Mar 08

"Additionally the very people that should be controlled (if that is the right term) by the introduction of such a scheme will be the first to exploit it illegally."


I've always tried to make this point. The very people you want to catch will be the ones who will get hooky ID cards, with which they will be able to prove beyond doubt that they are somebody else.

So many laws fall into the same trap - they inconvenience the general public - but the criminals igore them anyway. Gun control is a prime example. More guns than ever in the hands of criminals on the street - but previously legitimate gun-owners hassled beyond reason.

So with ID cars. Imagine - your ID card is lost - becomes corrupted - the database of details is hacked - you change naturally with age and your biometric details stop working correctly - the readers get hacked etc etc etc - it will all happen and more.

The criminals will still be safe with their false cards.

  DieSse 22:24 07 Mar 08

And as for someone in the government saying the ID card database will be secure because it won't be on-line.

What claptrap - if it's not on-line the cards will be virtually useless apart from biometric checking - and that's far, far from reliable.

Imagine you go into a store, and they take your ID card to check you are who you say you are. The biometric check fails (as it will in an alarmingly high number of cases) - what then? The police are called? - they confiscate your card? (what - a shop confiscating your ID card??) - they do nothing, but you can't use your credit card now?. What exactly?

And just who is going to have card-readers anyway? Just the police - that won't prevent ID fraud - any Tom dick or Harry? - that will get the system hacked faster than you can blink? Only those approved and vetted? - and who's going to do that - and how secure will that database be?

It's a logistical joke beyond measure.

  DieSse 22:32 07 Mar 08

Just in case you think it can't happen to you - it happened to me. I arrived in the UK late on a Friday night (just last year) and had my passport confiscated because "our system says you'd reported it stolen".

I then had a weekend to get it replaced at my expense so that I could travel on to the USA on the Monday night.

I actually managed to - and they were apologetic (and the staff were helpful - but amazed)and refunded the passport charges (but not my traveling costs, hone calls, or the fact that I missed one of three days in the UK visiting relatives. Imagine if I had been traveling straight on to the USA - it would have been impossible. All through a mistake in their system!

  WhiteTruckMan 23:08 07 Mar 08

is that these proposed cards seem to share the same technology as my current digitach card. This is the new(ish) smart card, the size of a credit card, with my picture on it that replaces the old circular paper charts called tachographs which monitor a truck (or bus) drivers driving activities. It seems that the reliability of these cards is leaving something to be desired, and that they are failing with in some cases monotonous regularity. One driver in my company has had 3 failed cards last year.

WTM

  Totally-braindead 23:39 07 Mar 08

At the end of the day, bearing in mind their dismal record recently I would think twice about getting an ID card when the government has all the info and loses everything on such a regular basis.

  Stuartli 00:01 08 Mar 08

Complete and utter waste of time.

It's all down to EU legislation and the sooner people realise this the better.

  Quickbeam 10:09 08 Mar 08

"I would think twice about getting an ID card when the government has all the info and loses everything on such a regular basis."

Why not have only the ID card with all your info on, with the various agencies having access only to the relevant info they require.

Customs could access the data of interest for them, making passports redundant. The Police could access driver or criminal info for, their purposes. VOSA could access their required info, banks, post offices etc... and the criminal world can access whatever info they like, for whatever reason they like via lost and pirated government DVDs sold on e-bay...!

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Sony Xperia XZ Premium review: Hands-on with the new 4K HDR phone with Motion Eye camera and Snapdr5…

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

Best laptop for design and art 2017: we test Apple, Dell, HP, Lenovo and Microsoft's best models…

CarPlay tips & troubleshooting guide: CarPlay tips & troubleshooting guide: Get the most from…