How young is too youg for a mobile phone?

  jack 11:33 28 Nov 10
Locked

I ask this because of an event on Thursday last.
Once a week I take myself off for a meal at the local Harvester.
So this occasion sitting at a table nearby a young family- mum, dad a young lad dof about 3/4 and an infant less than year old in her highchair.
Said infant was getting a little restive.
So what did mum do?
Give her ac hip so suck on - Nah
Give her a dummy[comforter as the Americans say]- Nah
She gave this infant- not a year old her mobile phone- evidently set up for sometihng- a game or photos- but this tiny thing in the highchair got down to it and was scrolling away as if the knowledge was hardwired from the time she popped out.
As they leabving I comment to dad how you can you get - Oh yeas and 'he' nedding to his son leaves me cold on the phone and computer
What next I wonder

  johndrew 13:58 28 Nov 10

Bit like sitting them in front of the TV for hours on end.

Or,

Allowing TVs, DVD players, computers, telephones or boy/girl friends in the bedroom.

  Forum Editor 15:24 28 Nov 10

to the 21st century.

At the beginning of the 20th century children were given spinning tops, and no doubt some people said 'whatever next?'.

Children who are born now will enter a life that will be filled with computer technology from the word go. They'll see it as being perfectly normal.

The world has changed more in the past 100 years than it did in the previous 200.

  johndrew 13:55 29 Nov 10

"Children who are born now will enter a life that will be filled with computer technology from the word go. They'll see it as being perfectly normal."

But perhaps fail to have any interpersonal or conversational skills as they have had either no-one to interact directly with.

Technology does not necessarily make better or more rounded individuals. I would argue that as a 'herd' animal man needs the contact of others rather than the remoteness provided by a TV, computer or 'phone. This may be even more important in the pre-school years.

At least children could fight over a spinning top.

  BT 17:04 29 Nov 10

You have a Harvester NEAR you.

I live in Norwich and the nearest Harvester is in Lowestoft. There is not a single one in the whole of Norfolk.

  Forum Editor 17:10 29 Nov 10

I sometimes visit schools to talk to children about the internet, and I'm usually very impressed by their interpersonal and conversational skills.

I don't think we have anything to worry about on that score - people will continue to relate to each other verbally. They'll just acquire additional communicative skills, that's all.

  jack 17:53 29 Nov 10

Yup
Five minute walk to the end of my road.
Was once a road house on what was the A2 coast road
built in the 1920's -since demolished and rebuilt about ten years ago as a Harvester- Dartford Bridge
last chance for a bite before you join the queue for the Crossing northbound or to recover after crossing southbound.

  Jameslayer 19:50 29 Nov 10

I fail to see how giving a child a phone that shows pictures is a problem. If it had been a book/photos(printed) we would not be having this debate.

Children learn through play and one of the things that children do which is vital in developing their skills is copying adults and their peers.

  jack 20:08 29 Nov 10

that shows pictures is a problem 'rote Jameslayer

I do not see it as a problem- just commenting on our times- picture books yesterday - picture players today- I commented on the apparent age of the infant and its seeming ability to use the device.

  Jameslayer 20:10 29 Nov 10

Sorry Jack I missunderstood your post.

Next will be holograms.

  Jameslayer 20:10 29 Nov 10

Sorry Jack I missunderstood your post.

Next will be holograms.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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