How do Loss Adjusters come to their conclusion

  pj123 13:40 13 Aug 08
Locked

Someone reversed out of a parking space and "bumped" in to my car door. I say bumped because that is exactly what it was. The damage is hardly noticeable but we exchanged details.

I made a claim with my insurance company thinking it would be paid by the other party.

My insurance company sent a Loss Adjuster to assess the damage. He told me the car was a write off!

Yes it is a 1994 registration and yes, its market value is probably around £500. It has a good service history and passes the MOT every time.

My insurance company offered me £500 less my excess (£100) and sent me a cheque for £400 with a condition that I could keep the car.

But to keep the car on the road I would have to get a VIC (Vehicle Identification Check) at a cost of £36, which I have done.

I have now since received another cheque from the other drivers insurance for £100 to make up my excess.

Appears to be a good deal, but is it?

I have got £500 in total (less £36 for the VIC) and still have the car on the road.

No repairs have been made to the door because the damage was so slight. Just a bit of T-Cut and a polish and you can’t see it.

The downside is that my registration documents (log book) now show that this vehicle has been involved in an accident and has been written off.

In hindsight it would have been better to ask the other driver to give me £50 and call it quits. I’ll remember that for next time.

How did the Loss Adjuster come to the conclusion that this was not economical to repair?

  johndrew 13:55 13 Aug 08

Probably based on what it would have cost for a body shop to either provide,spray and fit a new panel, or maybe to repair(?) the existing one, all against the age/condition/value of the vehicle. That and a bit of black magic of course!!

I should be quite happy if I were you. You have been given the market value of the vehicle, still got it and it`s roadworthy. You now have, effectively, a zero depreciation cost of motoring for as long as you keep it on the road. If the insurance company are happy to insure it the registration document entry means nothing unless you have another bump at which point you will find it has zero value as well - it was written off after all.

Probably worth running it until it starts getting expensive in parts and then offer it in part exchange against a new car - cheek will get you all sorts!!!!!

  jack 14:03 13 Aug 08

With workshop labour rates for insurers[cheaper for you direct]nudging £100 ph and perhaps the obligation to provide 'Vehicle off road -transport-free card] That £500 is soon eaten up.


Some years ago on a dark wet November night I skidded on some mus on the road and instead of taking a left curve- slid straight over and whacked the plastic front bumper of a car coming the other way.
It shattered like glass.
but it is only a bumper
Yet that car- then about 6 years old was written
off- it cost me nothing as I was protected.
Out of curiosity I enquired of the cost of replacing a bumper at the local Vauxhall dealer
Total cost of parts and paint- £200[then]
very weird - little wonder insurance costs so much.

  crosstrainer 14:19 13 Aug 08

How can you drive a car that has been written off? I'm guessing that's where the VIC comes in, but that doesn't check the car for chassis damage etc. does it?

  JYPX 14:48 13 Aug 08

pj123 - Many years ago I worked for a big insurance company. My job was to sell/invite offers for the written off vehicles, many of which were 5 year old cars with panel damage. The demand for these vehicles was truly unbelievable. What was not an option at the time was for the insured to buy his own scrap vehicle which left many unfortunate people trying to replace a cherished low mileage car, with a sum equivalent to the "book" value - an impossible task.
I am very pleased to hear that things have changed, at least in your case.

  Pine Man 15:05 13 Aug 08

You said:-

Appears to be a good deal, but is it?

1.I have got £500 in total (less £36 for the VIC) and still have the car on the road.

So, apart from the T 'cuttable' scratch, you still have the car and are £464 richer. Good so far.

2.No repairs have been made to the door because the damage was so slight. Just a bit of T-Cut and a polish and you can’t see it.

Still good.

3. The downside is that my registration documents (log book) now show that this vehicle has been involved in an accident and has been written off.

How is this a downside? The car is worth £500 and you have already got it's value by way of an insurance payout and you have still got the car. Whatever you sell it for makes even more profit.

4. In hindsight it would have been better to ask the other driver to give me £50 and call it quits. I’ll remember that for next time.

In this scenario you end up with your car and £50, which makes you $414 worse off.

Is there something I am missing?

  Pine Man 15:07 13 Aug 08

In the penultimate line $414 should read £414 - the exchange rate isn't that good!

  spuds 15:26 13 Aug 08

Perhaps if pj123 had accepted £50, then there would not have been the hassle of getting the vehicle checked and written off!.

When roadside deals take place, this can lead to many things in later days. What the eyes sees, a repair body-shop or insurance company might disagree, especially if a crumple zone is involved.

  namtas 15:37 13 Aug 08

I believe that this inforamtion is accurate
please check before acting:- If your car is declared a write off by your insurer they will advise DVLA of the category and list the damage.

Cat A = Vehicle must never go back on the road, no parts of the vehicle may be reused.

Cat B = As Cat A but parts can be reused.

Cat C = Can be restored and put back on the road but must be inspected by VOSA before being used on the road. VOSA will issue a Certificate if VIC test (Vehicle Identification Check) passed which is then taken to the DVLA which accompanies your application for a V5c Registration Document (£19 - V62).

Cat D = Very light damage but uneconomical to repair, can be put back on the road (may not need a VIC test as damage usually cosmetic).

One things for sure don't get caught driving a Cat A or Cat B on the road (if repaired) or a Cat C / D without a VIC test otherwise you will win a 12 month holiday at HM's pleasure!

  crosstrainer 16:14 13 Aug 08

That's my understanding also, I have built motorcycles from bit's, and had to have them rigourously inspected prior to using.

pj123

I would check that the vehicle is legal before driving it again.

  pj123 16:56 15 Aug 08

crosstrainer, just spoke to someone at the DVLA and she said that I can continue to drive the car at the moment as long as it is insured, which it is.

When the next VED is due (October 2008) I would have to submit a V62 to be able to re-tax it.

Got a couple of months to go now.

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