historical abuse

  mobileman1953 19:04 05 Jul 14
Locked

been a lot of speculation lately that some politicians were involved in historical abuse of kids, wonder if anyone comes forward and accuses any of them would police take any action

  Forum Editor 19:16 05 Jul 14

The police will obviously examine any evidence that is presented to them, and if they think there's enough to charge anyone the CPS will make a decision.

One of the great difficulties with child abuse cases lies in getting victims to come forward and give evidence in court. As time goes on many victims would rather just leave the past in the past.

The allegations you refer to are just that at the moment - nobody really knows quite what is supposed to have happened and when. It looks as though a vital dossier containing evidence, or references to evidence is missing, and it may take a government inquiry to move things forward.

  Mr Mistoffelees 20:14 05 Jul 14

"As time goes on many victims would rather just leave the past in the past."

That, as I know to my own cost, is a very difficult thing to do. Talking about abuse in private is even harder, let alone in a courtroom.

  rdave13 21:09 05 Jul 14

I don't really know what has happened in previous times, or what was 'accepted' then, but it seem to me that as a society we have a lot to be ashamed about. It's about time the dirty linen was hung out to dry and punish those that took advantage all those years ago, regardless of stature.

It's unbelievable that we can't look after our own children/ young adults even though these thing go back decades.

Is it still happening today, it makes you wonder?

  Aitchbee 22:14 05 Jul 14

... a vital document goes missing

It's quite feesible that it was innocently 'lost' in the post [ie. civil service internal post].

More likely a cover up!

  spider9 22:14 05 Jul 14

In times gone past, 'authority figures' were exactly that (whether show business, politicians or other 'important' people) and not only the very young would be frightened to complain about them.

In more recent times there has been a great shift in social attitudes, and, particularly following the MPs expenses scandals, much less reverence given to public figures.

The establishing of 'Childline' and changes in what is discussed with children also gives them much more confidence to report any misdemeanors, so these things should have been reduced - but, human nature being what it is, I cannot see it having been eradicated totally.

  spuds 01:01 06 Jul 14

Apparently some of the accusations go back between the 1981/85 era when a conservative MP Geoffrey Kenneth Dickens (who died in 1995) informed parliament, and Simon Christopher Danczuk MP for Rochdale as now brought further interest to the lost documents and request that a public investigation is undertaken. Simon Danczuk as recently wrote and published a book 'Smile for the Camera - The Double Life of Cyril Smith'

Simon Danczuk was before a select committee investigation regarding his knowledge of events, that was televised the other day on BBC Parliament programme.

Possibly worth a Wikipedia read on both Geoffrey Dickens and Simon Danczuk for more information on past and present events?.

  BillSers 09:14 06 Jul 14

'That, as I know to my own cost, is a very difficult thing to do. Talking about abuse in private is even harder, let alone in a courtroom.'

This is common amongst survivors of abuse to feel guilty (we prefer that expression rather than victims). The child invariably takes the blame, the young innocent mind feels it it their fault, that if it hadn't have been for them it wouldn't have happened.

That is why the abuser often gets away with it, with the added veiled threats of either castration (yes, it happens) or 'this is our little secret' etc.

The abuse will have an effect of the child's psyche and prevent them from being the best possible person they would have been had fate not intervened.

So I hope they catch these paedophiles, hidden in the corridors of power, before they get away with it like Savile and Smith.

  Forum Editor 10:53 06 Jul 14

"So we will have yet another inquiry, which no doubt will take years cost loads of public money and it's findings quietly ignored to a greater extent as is the case with governmental inquiries."

So, what would your alternative solution be?

  spuds 11:12 06 Jul 14

Perhaps off subject slightly, but in some corridors it is a well known fact how people need or have to react, whether that is due to bully techniques or simple 'friendly discussion'. And this is possibly why there should be a central confidential and easily obtainable outlet for whistle-blowing, including protection of those wanting to raise concerns. perhaps something similar on the lines of Crimestopper. This government have promised this, but so far very little seems to have been done.

Not all that long ago, there was a bit of a shake-up on how the CPS was functioning, and how improvements should be made on this service. Yet there are still deep concerns about this organisation and how its services are being administered. There are still cases of "not in the public interest" being highlighted, after events have taken place, that could have been prevented, had action been taken.

Why should a member of the public seek re-address via such things as the Freedom of Information Act, or by other difficult means, and even then you are not guaranteed any response, if someone thinks that their power over rules that of others?.

  spuds 11:25 06 Jul 14

Forum Editor

"So, what would your alternative solution be?"

You seem to have an awful lot of knowledge about these type of things and how the world works, so perhaps you could offer something realistic?.

From my own point of view, things have changed, and the introduction of the 'child suite' in some police stations with specialist officer's was one such good and beneficial move for children. This stopped the fear both for the child or children and even the guardians feeling a further disgrace. The other thing was the introduction of better methods and facilities for adult rape victims, including those for prostitutes who were being abused.

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