GP's to perform surgery....

  Hertz Van Rentyl 18:41 15 Oct 06
Locked

To ease the burden on Hospitals GP's are to perform minor surgical proceedures, 2 examples being varicose veins and hernia operations.
I am not sure when my GP would be available to carry out this work as the surgery is always fit to bursting point whenever I have had to make an appointment, then they have to do home visits and emergency call outs.
Frankly I would not let my Doctor carve a leg of lamb let alone start chiving away at my groin.
On a more serious note, operations usually need a team of skilled operatives(no pun intended)in a dedicated clean area so that unforseen events can be dealt with. Would you let a GP slice you up presumably under local anaesthetic in your dining room. I don't suppose anyone has asked the Doctors what they think about this idea either. Would anyone like to comment on this, no cutting remarks please.

  Bandy 19:22 15 Oct 06

As usual it's a case of horses for courses.

I would give my daughter's GP free access to do anything she liked to me. I trust her and her level of skills. This lady is an asset to her surgery and profession.

I wouldn't give my own GP access to a horse.

Having said that I have a similar response to the manner in which many others carry out their professions. The list is endless; policmen I would trust and those I wouldn't, council officers who are a delight and those that aren't.

The only problem is that we have to give people a chance in order to find out those who are going to be good.

So the end of the story to me is: give doctors the chance to perform surgey, the liklihood is that only those who want to do it, and those who are prepared to put in the effort will bother.

  Bandy 19:25 15 Oct 06

PS

On your point of opertives and buildings I am aware of some surgeries that have for some time invested in people and buildings to perform certain types of surgery, and those I know who have used the system have had nothing but praise for the people involved.

  Hertz Van Rentyl 19:34 15 Oct 06

Not sure whether it applies to all surgeries. I will put your name down for the shakedown trials, perhaps you can report back if you are able to.

  spuds 19:39 15 Oct 06

If a GP can save a women's life using a coat hanger and a bottle of spirits, on a transatlantic flight. Then that GP can operate on me anytime. It's the other GP's that I maybe a little bit concerned about.

I have full faith in my GP practice, they always asks me for a diagnosis and possible cure. Now where's that saw, needle and catgut :O)

  ulrich 20:28 15 Oct 06

I think my GP would have to operate in the car park or the waiting room, as the is no room anywhere else.

  WhiteTruckMan 23:05 15 Oct 06

in any trade or profession. You should be able to expect minimum standards though, and although I have a huge amount of respect for any kind of (medical) doctor, I also recognise they are only human, with the same human failings and foibles as the rest of us.

My own personal opinion is that the primary role of a GP is that of diagnostics, with actual treatment being limited to that of prescribing drugs and referring to specialists. Mundane items like cleaning and stitching wounds, taking blood pressures and applying bandages seem to be more in the province of nurses than doctors. I've no idea at all what kind of surgical training and practice GP's recive prior to qualifying, but it seems likely that the majority will be more than a bit rusty.

I would further mention that arguably one of the most terrifying incidents of my life was when a GP removed a tiny splinter of steel from the white of my eyeball with the aid of a strong light, a powerfull magnifying glass, a hypodermic needle and a tickly cough!

WTM

  WhiteTruckMan 23:05 15 Oct 06

in any trade or profession. You should be able to expect minimum standards though, and although I have a huge amount of respect for any kind of (medical) doctor, I also recognise they are only human, with the same human failings and foibles as the rest of us.

My own personal opinion is that the primary role of a GP is that of diagnostics, with actual treatment being limited to that of prescribing drugs and referring to specialists. Mundane items like cleaning and stitching wounds, taking blood pressures and applying bandages seem to be more in the province of nurses than doctors. I've no idea at all what kind of surgical training and practice GP's recive prior to qualifying, but it seems likely that the majority will be more than a bit rusty.

I would further mention that arguably one of the most terrifying incidents of my life was when a GP removed a tiny splinter of steel from the white of my eyeball with the aid of a strong light, a powerfull magnifying glass, a hypodermic needle and a tickly cough!

WTM

  WhiteTruckMan 23:07 15 Oct 06

My apologies. (I wonder why this happens from time to time)

WTM

  Jak_1 01:35 16 Oct 06

GP's to do minor surgery! And why not. So long as they get the funding for extra staff, stores and furbishing a dedicated room then fine. There is no technical reason why this cannot be done; the walls air ect of an operating theatre are not sterile, the air is filtered but not sterile. How do you think surgeons at war operate! One look at the Falklands war will show what can be done in the field.
I myself have carried out minor surgery at sea on a warship, I had no problem with infection related to carrying out the procedures as sterile rtechniques were followed. I am not a surgeon but was in the forces a highly trained medic. It's the ability to carry out the procedures that is the criteria and the means to create a sterile area for instruments and dressings etc.

  €dstowe 06:35 16 Oct 06

Perhaps the GPs of an area could form a collective and practice their surgery in a building or premises dedicated to doing surgical procedures.

They could call the building a hospital - you know, one of those places the government is so desperately trying to close.

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