Got that wonderful shrinking feeling?

  TopCat® 11 Feb 13
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Well this Japanese building has as it is slowly demolished floor by floor to ground level. No fuss, no inconvenience, explosives or dirt just a remarkable way of getting rid of a building with modern technology.

I can see this demolition method catching on around the world which will, no doubt, cause some consternation to the big bang brigade. What say you? TC.

  spuds 11 Feb 13

Possibly a good clean method, but what about the cost, and whether the building structure is capable of being reduced to rubble or recycle via the method being used?.

  bumpkin 11 Feb 13

What is actually happening here? are they supporting the building on jacks and taking out the lower levels and gradually bringing it down, if so it is very clever engineering. Safety issues spring to mind on this as does expense but a great idea that aside.

  fourm member 12 Feb 13

It is an interesting application, on a very much grander scale, of a well-known method for erecting and removing tower cranes.

But, I can't help thinking it shouldn't be necessary. The report says that hotel was built in the '80s. How wasteful to be already demolishing it.

  Forum Editor 12 Feb 13

"How wasteful to be already demolishing it."

Yes, but it happens all over the world as the available building land in big cities is used up. Advances in construction techniques and revisions in planning laws often permit much taller buildings with small footprints,and you can't easily add ten floors to existing buildings.

The commercial centres in cities like Tokyo, Shanghai, London and Hong Kong are in a permanent state of change as buildings are demolished and replaced. Being able to remove a building from a cramped location using this technique is a real advantage.

  WhiteTruckMan 12 Feb 13

It seems overly complicated to me. If you're going to dismantle a building instead of using a brute force demolition method then surely it would be easier (and faster and cheaper)to do it from the top down rather than the bottom up.

WTM

  Quickbeam 12 Feb 13

I wonder if future skyscapper designs will take into account an easy clean demolition option?

But just blowing them up is much more fun!

  bumpkin 12 Feb 13

WTM That was my first thought but maybe this is not practical if there is no room for a crane. Building is no doubt steel and concrete construction so how would they get down the huge amount of demolition waste. Down the inside sounds OK but all the floors will be reinforced concrete. As well as that problem they would need to prevent even small bits of debris falling off. Not an easy job however it is approached.

  Forum Editor 12 Feb 13

"If you're going to dismantle a building instead of using a brute force demolition method then surely it would be easier (and faster and cheaper)to do it from the top down rather than the bottom up."

It's neither faster or cheaper to take down a multi-storey building from the top down.

The cheapest and fastest method is to drop the structure down with explosive charges. Setting the charges is a highly skilled and time-consuming process, but actual demolition takes a few seconds.

The method used in this Tokyo example is not cheap by any means, and it certainly isn't fast, but it negates the risk of injury to people and damaging nearby buildings, and eliminates the huge dust cloud that accompanies the explosive method.

Either way, you still have the waste clearance costs.

  Bing.alau 12 Feb 13

As time is money I am wondering how long this is taking or how long it took? It looks a very expensive method of removing a building.

I am filled with admiration for modern engineers and their methods, If any are reading this take a bow.

  WhiteTruckMan 12 Feb 13

It's neither faster or cheaper to take down a multi-storey building from the top down.

When compared to doing it from the bottom as I originally said?

WTM

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