Cruise ship crack in top deck

  Strawballs 17:16 20 Oct 12
Locked

Emergency repairsThis sort of thing will happen when Shipyards are leaned on to build these things faster and faster, quality will suffer

  Forum Editor 17:40 20 Oct 12

How do you know that the shipyard was 'leaned on' to build this ship faster?

The problem may have been caused by a design fault, rather than by defective work during construction. In any event, it's obviously not serious "The ship is expected to resume sailing later on a short cruise to Belgium"

  Strawballs 17:54 20 Oct 12

It will not be serious at the top of the superstructure, but the cruise companies want their ships as fast as possible (I can see why they can be earning them money sooner) so the yards put in times that are cut to the bone to get the contract which leads them to lean on their managers so corners might be cut if a problem arises to keep on track.

  lotvic 17:56 20 Oct 12

"Passengers described the crack on board .....as three inches (60mm) wide, stretching the entire width of the aluminium deck"

There must be a lot of (metal) stresses going on for that to happen or maybe the deck shrunk when it got wet ;)

  Woolwell 18:04 20 Oct 12

Regrettably cracks do occur in ships especially if they've been subjected to very high seas. I remember a frigate that was concerned that it was going to lose part of its superstructure due to high seas and that ship wasn't built quickly. Better report cruise critic which does state that it was after a rough crossing of the Bay of Biscay.

  Al94 18:13 20 Oct 12

Photo here http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/9996556.POrepairsVenturadeck_crack/

Looks big but not structural.

  Forum Editor 18:17 20 Oct 12

A crack that runs across what looks like an aluminium panel is hardly likely to be the result of shoddy workmanship. A faulty design detail is far more likely.

  onthelimit1 19:06 20 Oct 12

'the cruise companies want their ships as fast as possible (I can see why they can be earning them money sooner) so the yards put in times that are cut to the bone to get the contract which leads them to lean on their managers so corners might be cut if a problem arises to keep on track.'

And where is your justification for saying this, or proof of this?

  rdave13 19:26 20 Oct 12

It could well be a design fault but it could also be recession putting pressure on businesses to reach deadlines. Who knows, but the repairers will surely see what happened to create the stress that caused this?

  namtas 19:37 20 Oct 12

The photo shows that the plate has not just cracked but pulled apart which would indicate a stress fracture, most likely due to a design fault, any repair could be difficult and end up chasing tails. It is reported as being aluminium so could be caused by harmonic vibration which can be a problem with aluminium at low as well as high frequencies, more so if there is a stress raiser present which can be a indent, a scratch or even a welded angle section.

  Ventad 19:43 20 Oct 12

Perhaps they did not put in a flexi-joint across the deck, on a R.N. Ships they always had a strip right across the upper deck and in gales etc. you could watch the deck flexing and contracting as they mounted the waves and entered the troughs. I used to wonder why the water did not get under the strip and leak to the deck below when the sea was coming inboard and washing across the deck.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Nintendo Switch review: Hands-on with the intuitive modular console and its disappointing games…

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

Method Studios' title sequence for BBC series Taboo is truly unsettling

Best Pages for iOS tips | How to use Pages for iPad & iPhone: 6 simple tips to get more out of…