The conventions are wrong

  antony.dandrea 19:11 18 Apr 08
Locked

There are two conventions that i wish to correct.

Radiators in homes do anything but radiate heat. they are designed specifically not to radiate. they use convection currents instead.

Secondly electricity does not travel from positive to negative. its actually the other way around cos electrons are negative but people got it wrong so they eft it like that.
Thank you

Doctor

  anskyber 19:14 18 Apr 08

Right, that's handy to know.

Forgive my stupidity ( most do not here) but can you give me a clue about the area you hoped we would debate?

Is it the fallacy of understood truths?

  antony.dandrea 19:20 18 Apr 08

Well there was another discusion of a similar thing.
PLus it may be a trick question in the future, which u will now get right.

and forgive my stupididty but wat kind of name is anskyber

  antony.dandrea 19:20 18 Apr 08

Well there was another discusion of a similar thing.
PLus it may be a trick question in the future, which u will now get right.

and forgive my stupididty but wat kind of name is anskyber

  Earthsea 19:23 18 Apr 08

Dr Troll, I presume?

  octal 19:23 18 Apr 08

"Secondly electricity does not travel from positive to negative. its actually the other way around cos electrons are negative but people got it wrong so they eft it like that."

If you can't grasp that you'll never understand how electronic vacuum tubes work ;)

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 19:35 18 Apr 08

Electrons need "holes" to drop into, so do "holes" therefore move the "right way" as the electron leaves the atom?

"Radiator is a set of pipes or tubes that gives off heat to its surroundings. Steam or hot-water radiators in homes transfer heat to the air in a room. When warmed, the air next to the pipes expands, becomes lighter, and rises. Cooler air from the room streams in to take its place, creating a constant circulation of air. This process is called convection, and certain types of radiators are called convectors.
Radiators also heat room air by direct radiation."
click here

In practice, the term "radiator" refers to any of a number of devices in which a liquid circulates through exposed pipes (often with fins or other means of increasing surface area), notwithstanding that such devices tend to transfer heat mainly by convection and might logically be called convectors. The term "convector" refers to a class of devices in which the source of heat is not directly exposed.
click here

  anskyber 19:52 18 Apr 08

"and forgive my stupididty but wat kind of name is anskyber" (sic.)

Forgiven.

I'm looking for help here. I've come across a number of questions in my life but seldom ones like these. A trick question for the future?

Yes, I have a number of those, the answers to which I keep at hand at all times.

So this is information, rather than a subject for debate in the forum designed for debate?

Thanks. I feel renewed.

  csqwared 19:57 18 Apr 08

Ah, but is the electricity AC or DC. If it's AC it travels both ways.

  laurie53 20:32 18 Apr 08

Here's a good trick question - "What was the last propellor driven aeroplane used by the British armed forces?"

I've won many a pint on this, but I'm sure the members of this forum will have it cracked before Brumas's weekly offering later.

  ray7 21:26 18 Apr 08

'Ah, but is the electricity AC or DC......

And is it standard or economy 7

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Nintendo Switch review: Hands-on with the intuitive modular console and its disappointing games…

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

This abstract video touches on division in our technologic world

Best alternatives to iTunes for Mac | Best music players for macOS: Free your music from the…