Chugging

  peter99co 14:32 27 Aug 10
Locked

Charities are paying £100 to street sellers who get you to sign up for a direct debit.

They stop you on the street and get you to sign up and receive £100 - £150 for each person they persuade to set up a direct debit of £8 or £10.

I cannot find a link but the TV commentator suggested that it could take 18 months for the charity to gain the money it had spent recruiting these charity muggers.

It appears there are a few of the big charities engaged in this kind of scheme.

I could not believe this was a common sense way of operating.

  dastardly mutt 14:42 27 Aug 10

Would you really give your personal and bank details to someone in the street. You deserve to be mugged.
Regrettably, collecting for charities can be profitable for the collectors. Donors have to be cautious about where and how they make their donations.

  Bapou 16:44 27 Aug 10

If you could not find the TV link there was always you know who, click here to help out.

I suppose it was best not mentioning the alternative, classed as an unreliable source round these parts.

  Armchair 09:58 28 Aug 10

Never donate cash to any charity, to be on the safe side.

  spuds 18:44 28 Aug 10

Charity begins at home perhaps!.

Personally I stopped giving to the big charities after seeing some of their account sheets, and what the top management earns in salary and perks.

Perhaps its me, but I tend to find that most of the people doing the 'chugging' are students wearing tea-shirts or fluorescents with some name or another, who tend to get in your face as you are trying to do your daily chores ;o(

Only the other evening, we had at teatime a loud banging on the front door. Standing there was a rather smartly dressed youth with a Red Cross display item. After trying to explain that there was a rather large notice regarding cold callers on the door, plus our area is a designated 'no cold-calling area'. The 'representative' of the Red Cross still didn't get the message.Very annoying, which didn't serve the charity very well.

It also applies to the people you see smartly dressed in suits that come knocking on your door asking you to sign up. A lot of people mistakenly assume that someone working on behalf of a charity will be working voluntary but that is not the case!

I guess the answer is if you want to donate to a particular charity then make sure your donation goes directly to them by a means that won't involve commision, such as through their website.

It also applies to the people you see smartly dressed in suits that come knocking on your door asking you to sign up. A lot of people mistakenly assume that someone working on behalf of a charity will be working voluntary but that is not the case!

I guess the answer is if you want to donate to a particular charity then make sure your donation goes directly to them by a means that won't involve commision, such as through their website.

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