Can You Really Mail a Coconut?

  The Brigadier 10:09 06 Mar 07
Locked

Believe it or not, the United States Postal Service (USPS) does allow ordinary citizens to mail a coconut without any additional packaging required. It is just as easy to mail a coconut as it is to ship a standard package or crate. The USPS views a coconut as a self-contained unit, one which cannot be easily tampered with by criminals or readily examined by postal inspectors. As long as the coconut contains both a proper address label and sufficient postage, the USPS will literally mail a coconut for you.

We have the Hawaiian tourist trade to thank for the ability to mail a coconut. Visitors to Hawaii can often purchase a souvenir coconut instead of a traditional paper postcard. These gift coconuts may be elaborately decorated with local scenes or other traditional Hawaiian art. All that is required to mail a coconut souvenir "postcard" is an address and proof of postage. Hawaiian branches of the USPS are accustomed to helping tourists who wish to mail a coconut back to the mainland.

Although Hawaii or other tropical locales may be the most common places from which to mail a coconut, there really are no restrictions on the practice within the United States. Anyone can literally pick up a coconut from a local grocery store and affix a mailing label to it. The local mail carriers may not be entirely thrilled to lug a coconut around all day, but it is perfectly legal to mail a coconut instead of an envelope.
Of course, there may be a few flies in the ointment if you should decide to mail a coconut instead of a first-class letter for all of your correspondence. The novelty of receiving a mailed coconut is bound to wear off quickly, and not everything can be safely delivered via a system straight out of Gilligan's Island. While it might be considered a nice gesture to mail a coconut to your frozen relatives while vacationing in Hawaii, try not to get too carried away the rest of the year. Even postal loopholes have limits.

  Totally-braindead 10:15 06 Mar 07

They must be coco-nuts fot thinking of this one.

  I am Spartacus 10:22 06 Mar 07

Great idea click here

  anskyber 10:36 06 Mar 07

I'm sitting here, speechless.

  GANDALF <|:-)> 10:46 06 Mar 07

In my book sending a carved coconut is the same as bringing back a garish sombrero or gaudy toy donkey..but each to their own.

G

  wolfie3000 11:43 06 Mar 07

No need to post coconuts they migrate,

Dont they???

click here

  Jak_1 15:58 06 Mar 07

Yes it can be done, without packaging. A friend of mine mailed one from Diego Garcia (British Indian Ocean Territory) simply by sticking on an address lable and the appropriate postage stamps. It arrived in Plymouth in perfect condition. It was still in it's complete husk.

  bennyhillslovechild 16:54 06 Mar 07

Wolfie3000 - Made my day that did! Now going to have to dig out my Python box set for a night of silliness!

:)

  STREETWORK 18:40 06 Mar 07

When I served in Belize with HM Forces you could get a coconut painted with a scene and the postal address, stick a stamp on it and post it anywhere in the world. I think I sent about 8 to family and friends, and they all got them undamaged...

So, yes you can post a coconut...

  Forum Editor 19:10 06 Mar 07

has been pretty successful at mailing itself over the millennia.

Experts re now pretty certain that coconuts originated in South East Asia, probably Malaysia. Since then they've spread pretty well everywhere, as long as the climate is right. Much of the travelling has been done by the coconut itself - its husk covering makes an ideal floating transport system. I've seen several instances of the classic desert island beach with coconuts washed up and sprouting in the sand. You wouldn't think a tree could survive in just salty sand, but they do.

  interzone55 21:14 06 Mar 07

If you can mail a coconut without further wrapping, why do supermarkets insist on wrapping them?

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