Are we heading out of the Recession?.

  spuds 11:04 AM 10 Dec 12
Locked
Answered

We seem to be hearing all sorts of stories, mainly from political sources, about the Recession and what is being done.

But what are your views, because in my location, there seems to be a rather disturbing increase of company's closing down at very short notice, with the end results that not only the major company as failed, but so as the other people and smaller company's involved within the industry, possibly as sub-contractor's.

  Picklefactory 11:20 AM 10 Dec 12

Not seeing any easing yet in the industry I'm in (Heavy duty automotive). Still pretty flat, although not getting any worse just now, so small comfort there.

  Bing.alau 11:37 AM 10 Dec 12

No sign of a recession at my local supermarket. Trolleys loaded up to the gunnels with all sorts of goodies that will be thrown away after Christmas.

Being retired the recession hasn't really affected me in any way. So I am probably one of the lucky ones. Mind you I have been through a few recessions since WW2. In fact I think it has been one long one, because people are always going on about how hard done to they are. Lost count of the number of times I have watched interviews on TV where the people complaining about a lack of cash, were smoking their heads off whilst drinking pints of beer in the local pub or club.

  Quickbeam 11:47 AM 10 Dec 12

I still seem to be treading mud, and expect to for two or three more years yet...

  spuds 12:25 PM 10 Dec 12

Knock on effect!.

I have to agree, seeing some peoples shopping or spending habits appear to have not changed in the least.

What made me raise the question, is that one of the local 100+ year old family owned building company's had to file for insolvency a couple of weeks ago, because one of their contractor's were taking court action for non-payments. This original company as an whole host of expensive big, medium and small scale projects on the move, and with one of its creditor's actions have now put suddenly many (and we are talking quite a lot) other smaller companies and self-employed out of business, or on the verge of doing so.

One of my neighbours as been a partner in a local well known and respected scaffolding firm, employing about 29 people. He is owed £29.000 by the above family company, and through other debt's he as had to call in a team of insolvency experts late last week, and notifying his staff that they no longer have jobs. Speaking to him this weekend, he knew the recession was bad, because last year he had to downsize slightly, but he and his other partner had no idea their company would cease to exist at such short notice, in a matter of days. His biggest burden, is the fact that not only as he had to tell his staff they no longer have jobs, but those employers were very loyal and good friend's of his. Which is not only ruining his and family Christmas, but perhaps more so, that of his now unemployed team.

  Forum Editor 12:43 PM 10 Dec 12

Companies will continue to fail as the economic situations bites - the new year will probably see the demise of some businesses in the retail sector.

Things are very tough, and according to one economist I spoke to over the weekend we will not emerge from recession for 'another few years'. He said it's the same old story - a lack of confidence on the part of investors and lenders. The way out is -in his opinion - for us to work hard and remain optimistic. Our worst enemies are despondency and apathy.

  interzone55 12:48 PM 10 Dec 12

It's odd isn't it - the recession is to continue because of "a lack of confidence on the part of investors and lenders" - but the city where the "investors and lenders" live, London, is probably the least affected place in the UK

  spuds 13:17 PM 10 Dec 12

"The way out is- in his opinion - for us to work hard and remain optimistic"

Very fine words, but what happens when you are working hard. Possibly irregular hours and seven days, and you still find that you have to inform your employees and loyal friend's that they are now unemployed, in a trade that is possibly more reliant on weather and regular payments.

Banks and financier's can become insolvent, and the government soon steps in. But who is stepping in, and supporting the vast majority of struggling small or medium scale business enterprises. Certainly not the big investor's, bank's or those ready to receive hand-outs or allowances on a regular basis. But I forgot, We are all in this together?.

Would add, that the neighbour as just had the vehicle leasing company collect their vehicles. Things certainly seem to be moving fast!.

  Forum Editor 13:23 PM 10 Dec 12

alan14

"...the city where the "investors and lenders" live, London, is probably the least affected place in the UK"

What an odd thing to say - what makes you think that?

  Forum Editor 13:35 PM 10 Dec 12

spuds

"...what happens when you are working hard. Possibly irregular hours and seven days, and you still find that you have to inform your employees and loyal friend's that they are now unemployed, in a trade that is possibly more reliant on weather and regular payments."

It's not just financiers who become insolvent spuds - it happens to all kinds of business. Financiers have no more protection than anyone else when it happens.

Lots of people have had to tell employees that their jobs are no longer there - and many of them have had to do it to a lot more than 29 people over the past few years. What happens is very much down to the person or people whose business it is, and to receivers and insolvency specialists.

Scaffolding businesses are part of the construction industry, and that sector has been hit hard over the past couple of years. Lots of small businesses have become insolvent, and lots more are struggling, that's what happens in recessions. Small businesses commonly don't have the financial resources to weather the storm, and when debtors fail to pay it can bring them to the tipping point.

There's no reason that the taxpayer should be expected to support small businesses that become insolvent.

  interzone55 14:06 PM 10 Dec 12

Forum Editor

There's no denying that London has weathered the recession much better than the rest of the UK, and the banks are based in London and the bankers mostly live in the M25, that's why I said that.

If you look at most other cities there are shuttered shops, some places have upwards of 20% empty shops, so many that they can't even be filled by charity shops and pawn brokers.

I didn't see this problem on my last visit to London...

Advertisement

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

How to watch EA Gamescom 2015 Press Conference live: EA Gamescom live stream - watch EA talk Star…

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

Play the retro 8-bit dating naked adventure game by The Uprising Creative

From Antennagate to Yellowgate: The 10 worst Apple scandals (and why they were blown out of proport)…