Any wine experts out there?

  TopCat® 14:10 04 Jul 08
Locked

On vintage port, that is.

Many years ago, my wife worked for the French shippers, Bouchard Aine é Fils on Halkin Street, London and she gave a bottle of Rebello Valente 1966 port, bottled in 1968 by Robertson Bros Ltd, Oporto, to an elderly friend. This friend never opened it and it languished in his drinks cabinet until his death and his effects cleared away; standing upright and not laid down. As a consequence the cork seal has its top covering piece missing thereby revealing the cork itself.

My daughter recently passed this port over to me and I wondered if it would still be drinkable after careful decanting - the liquid is down about 35mm from the cork, by the way. Thank goodness it's still a liquid and not a rust removing sludge! :o)

Thank you for any comments on the matter. TC.

  Bingalau 14:14 04 Jul 08

Just open it up and taste it. If it's 'orrible then chuck it down the drain. If it tastes o.k. then sip it slowly until you are lying in the drain.

  johndrew 14:24 04 Jul 08

You may well find it has a large amount of sediment in the bottom of the bottle. I would suggest you slowly and carefully decant it through a fine filter into a clean glass vessel. It should then be perfectly drinkable.

If you simply pour it into glasses the movement of the bottle as you pour and stop will disturb the sediment and make the taste less than you would like.

  TopCat® 14:44 04 Jul 08

You are priceless! :o)) It is the obvious thing to do but I'm not a port lover. If it has some value to someone then I'd get rid of it that way. Better that than just empty it away and recycle the bottle.

My main concern is the fact that the cork has not touched the liquid for many years and I'd hate to pass over an undrinkable wine. TC.

  Bingalau 14:49 04 Jul 08

If you lived next door to me and passed it over. As long as you told me the history of it, I would be delighted to accept it. By the way I don't like wines normally, but fortified wines like port or sherry are a different kettle of fish. Oh yes I never turn down a nice sweet champers or an Asti Spumante either. But can't stand the "Brut". In other words I like lemonade type drinks as long as they have a kick as well.

  peter99co 14:50 04 Jul 08

After leaving the bottle to stand after removing the cork, you should hold the bottle in front of a lamp or candle when decanting so you can see the sediment as you pour through a paper filter into a clean container.

  Forum Editor 15:09 04 Jul 08

this port is superb, and the 1968 bottling will only just be coming to its best. If the cork has been exposed and allowed to dry it's likely that some damage has occurred, but there's a chance the wine will be good - there's only one way to find out.

Some good wine merchants will re-cork wine for you, but it's usually not worth the hassle unless you have a quantity.

  wiz-king 18:12 04 Jul 08

I think you need a new spell-checker - on this forum wine is usually spelt whine! *grin*

  Snec 19:55 04 Jul 08

I'd pour it carefully into a demijohn and fortify it with at least litre of vodka.

  wee eddie 21:43 04 Jul 08

It would be best put on it's side for a couple of weeks, maybe 3 or more > Have a decanter (a clear bottle will do) and a Funnel (Silver is best for seeing the sediment) ready > Then slowly raise the Neck by about 4" and draw the cork > Without moving the base of the Port Bottle > Have the funnel ready in the top of the Decanter and put the Decanter under the mouth of the bottle > Slowly lower the neck of the port bottle until the Port flows across the silver funnel into the Decanter > Try to avoid the port "glugging" > When you see the first evidence of sediment > stop pouring.

  Bingalau 22:06 04 Jul 08

Then pour the rest through a filter paper, obtainable at any home brew type shop. Waste not want not.

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