Abu Qatada release: Cameron 'fed up'

  Forum Editor 18:20 PM 13 Nov 12

There does seem to be something quite ridiculous about a situation in which a man who is - to use our Prime Minister's own words "..has no right to be here, we believe he's a threat to our country," and yet cannot be expelled by us.

We literally cannot put this individual on a plane out of here because someone sitting in a court in Strasbourg decided that he would not get a fair trial in Jordan, where he's wanted.

I'm well-known for championing the rule of law, but there are times when I wonder if we haven't lost sight of the ball, and this is one of them. In 21 days our government must either come up with a valid legal reason for an appeal against the ruling or release Abu Qatada back into the community. It's a cast iron guarantee that his lawyers will challenge every inch of the way.

Perhaps we should send the man to Strasbourg, and let them have the problem.

  Bing.alau 18:32 PM 13 Nov 12

I agree, Strasbourg is where he should be. They should have a holding center there for these type of people. Other European countries could contribute to the upkeep of a huge prison.

  Bing.alau 18:33 PM 13 Nov 12

Oh yes , don't forget his family must go with him.

  TonyV 18:33 PM 13 Nov 12

No, send him to back to Jordan and wait for the backlash. After all that is where he belongs, not here. But there again, we will keep him in ways he would like to be kept!! Almost everything paid for by others.

I'd be willing to bet, that once he is back in Jordan, they will not release him back again


  TonyV 18:35 PM 13 Nov 12

Isn't the saying "The law is an ass"? This decision most certainly proves the point.


  onthelimit1 18:36 PM 13 Nov 12

The Human Rights saga has got way out of hand. Initially it did prevent some appalling actions, but just abused now at huge cost (and risk) to us. Time for a rethink.

  Flak999 18:38 PM 13 Nov 12

In the piece quoted it says that the Strasbourg court had found that he could be extradited!

"Earlier this year, judges at the European Court in Strasbourg ruled the cleric would not face ill-treatment if returned to Jordan, citing assurances outlined in a UK-Jordan agreement."

It was the judge in the UK at the Special immigration appeals tribunal that ruled he could not be extradited!

  john bunyan 18:44 PM 13 Nov 12

Maybe Parliament should pass emergency legislation on this case alone ensuring that Parliament decrees in this case that a special UK law passed by sovereign Parliament cannot be overturned as Parliament is the highest court.

  csqwared 19:06 PM 13 Nov 12

Human rights? The rights of one man as opposed to the rights of 60 million UK inhabitants!! Can't see it myself. The only place this man should be is in Jordan, we should ignore Strasboursg and just send him back. I wonder what the European ramifications would be, if any?

  WhiteTruckMan 19:10 PM 13 Nov 12

It's a cast iron guarantee that his lawyers will challenge every inch of the way.

There is no cause so vile and twisted that some lawyer isn't willing to make a buck off it. Be in no doubt, some lawyers will have done very well indeed out of this miserable specimen of (in)humanity.

The rule of law is one thing. But what we are seeing here is a simple perversion of it.


  TonyV 19:21 PM 13 Nov 12


The ramifications would be along the lines of what France got fined when they transgressed recently. They were fined €15,000. Money well spent and an awful lot cheaper than keeping him here and paying Lawyers their exorbitant sums.



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