xp home recovery drive disappeared

  erik bloodaxe 16:28 05 Feb 05
Locked

Not my problem,thank goodness.Friend has emachine 128mb running xp home sp2.Tried to play DVD using Power DVD and PC must have crashed.Now cannot restore,scanner not working,but OE and IE fine.Have found out that he doesn't turn off but simply logs off (despite fact that he is only user) then switches off at mains.Also,has no recovery drive - presumably accounts for inability to restore.IMHO,needs drive format and reinstall,plus maybe memory upgrade.Any suggestions gratefully received.

  Jackcoms 16:39 05 Feb 05

"simply logs off (despite fact that he is only user) then switches off at mains".

Bit of a prat isn't he?

Yes, certainly a memory upgrade needed. Ideal minimum for XP is 256mb.

  FelixTCat 18:31 05 Feb 05

If he can still boot, either normally or into safe mode, get him to run scandisk on his system drive, then delete all the files in the Temp directory, defrag the system drive and reboot. If the scanner still doesn't work, delete it from Device Manager and reboot. It should reappear as new hardware and reload its drivers.

Instruct him on how to shut down properly (I find a half brick effective in helping people remember).

  erik bloodaxe 20:40 05 Feb 05

Thanks Jackcoms and FelixTCat for replies.Unfortunately,friend has already tried uninstalling and reinstalling scanner,with no luck.I said it wasn't my problem,but I'm the silly sod who's in line to go and sort it all out (no picnic as he lives 80 miles away).My real concern is that recovery drive seems to have disappeared down a black hole,never to return.Old pal's machine has OEM xp and - you've guessed it -he had no idea that he should have made recovery discs. I can't see any way that the existing system is viable,as it is no longer possible to use system restore,which somewhat defeats the idea of xp.To put the question again : do you think it would be appropriate to do a full reinstall? Also,how easy/difficult is it to install more memory,as I have never attempted this myself?

  FelixTCat 12:30 06 Feb 05

I don't think that the recovery drive can have disappeared (unless you are referring to a CD) - it may just be hidden. When manufacturers pre-install, they have a number of ways of putting the windows files on the hard drive. One is to include a directory under C:\Windows called i386 or Cabs or similar. Another is a hidden partition which is addressed by a disk provided. Fdisk will normally show this.

Another solution may be to try the system file checker (sfc.exe in windows\system32) This compares files on the system with the originals and highlights discrepancies. It may ask for the original WinXP disk, but I think ANY XP disk (Home or Pro as appropriate) will do. It may be necessary to reinstall programs or drivers later as these may have installed new system files and may not work if older files are reinstalled.

More memory is easy. Open the computer and look inside. You will see the memory units standing up from the motherboard close to the IDE connectors. They are held in place by clips at the ends. If there is an empty slot, you simply install another memory unit of whatever size you desire. Sometimes all the slots are full, in which case you normally have to replace two. Go to crucial com: click here which will walk you through the process of identifying the type of memory you need. For XP, 512 MByte of memory is a god total - 1024 if carrying out intensive work on large files.

  FelixTCat 12:32 06 Feb 05

I don't think that the recovery drive can have disappeared (unless you are referring to a CD) - it may just be hidden. When manufacturers pre-install, they have a number of ways of putting the windows files on the hard drive. One is to include a directory under C:\Windows called i386 or Cabs or similar. Another is a hidden partition which is addressed by a disk provided. Fdisk will normally show this.

Another solution may be to try the system file checker (sfc.exe in windows\system32) This compares files on the system with the originals and highlights discrepancies. It may ask for the original WinXP disk, but I think ANY XP disk (Home or Pro as appropriate) will do. It may be necessary to reinstall programs or drivers later as these may have installed new system files and may not work if older files are reinstalled.

More memory is easy. Open the computer and look inside. You will see the memory units standing up from the motherboard close to the IDE connectors. They are held in place by clips at the ends. If there is an empty slot, you simply install another memory unit of whatever size you desire. Sometimes all the slots are full, in which case you normally have to replace two. Go to crucial com: click here which will walk you through the process of identifying the type of memory you need. For XP, 512 MByte of memory is a god total - 1024 if carrying out intensive work on large files.

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