XP BOOT PROBLEMS, BIOS F1 F2.

  dezi 15:31 25 Sep 03
Locked

My usual simple Boot-up procedure to the Desktop has gone Kaput.
On booting up now,(last 2 weeks) I always receive a few high pitch bleeps and then a screen load of Amibios specifications and of the computer. At the bottom of the page given the option F1 "to run setup" and
F2 "to load default values and continue."
F1 is no good.
F2 takes me to Bios where the clock is always set at zero. I then input the correct time, day, month, year then save,then exit Bios in the usual way. I am then gradually set up to my usual desktop and settings. There is the 'very odd' time where this does not occur, very frustrating to go through the procedure twice a day.
Any advice appreciated.

  Linus Tourvalds 15:56 25 Sep 03

try this

set your pc to boot from cd

insert xp disc and reboot

in options choose recovery console

select 1 for windows to log into

enter password

then type 'fixmbr'

without the quotes

then hit enter

then type y

then hit enter

remove cd and reboot

it might work did for me when i had boot problems

  Rayuk 18:13 25 Sep 03

Have you had the pc for long could also be the battery running low and not saving your bios settings.

Can you say exactly what beeps you hear long short and numbers of.

  alan 2273 18:28 25 Sep 03

According to the Amibios beep codes, 2 beeps means either a Memory parity error or a Post failure ( One of the hardware tests has failed ).

  dezi 18:04 26 Sep 03

Thanks for the replies thus far guys. I forgot to mention in my posting, XP BOOT PROBLEMS...... BIOS F1, F2 .
After the specs and test data on the screen there is a statement..... "CMOS/GPNV Checksum Bad.
Cant cope with it!

As far as I can remember re the bleeps on booting, they are short (1 bleep followed in a couple of secs by 2 bleeps) I think, but will pay attention the next bootup and let you know.

  dezi 18:07 26 Sep 03

I forgot to mention in my, XP BOOT PROBLEMS...... BIOS F1, F2 .
After the specs and test data there is a statement..... "CMOS/GPNV Checksum Bad."
Cant cope with it!

  Rayuk 18:26 26 Sep 03

This could be a bad battery or posssibly ram.
There is another thread very similar to yours you could also keep an eye on.
click here

and
click here
A battery is a cheap option to try.

  alan 2273 19:51 26 Sep 03

thoffman has the fix for it pretty much... But to answer your question about a checksum error.

A checksum error is or shows that upon boot up settings which were set previously have now changed. The BIOS keeps a set integer which it compares with while it is going through the settings, this is stored in the CMOS memory after a change in the BIOS or when you turn off the computer. Each setting has a designated number whether on or off, on maybe equals 14 and off means 24(these will be different upon the settings as well), these designated values add up to a unique(no other number like it can be generated unless certain conditions are met) integer which is stored in the BIOS. Upon booting up the BIOS will be going through all the settings, it will add up all the values of the settings and then compare with the unique integer stored in the CMOS's memory, if the number doesn't match then a checksum error occurs. To be safe the computer will normally return to default settings since it has no idea what the original settings were, the integer value doesn't match that means the settings are not correct from the previous stored setting. The checksum error will normally force the BIOS to return to default settings since that is the most reliable thing to fall back on. If the integer values match then the computer beeps and begins regular operation. Common problem related to this is the BIOS battery ran out so the value in the CMOS memory is not kept, so the checksum error is bound to occur... Sometimes it could be that the BIOS did not change the settings previously after you switch off your computer and the checksum error occured because of that... Most times though you can just recover from what you got at the time and probably run the computer normally once you reinput your original settings(most are auto so it really don't affect you all that much).

  dezi 00:39 27 Sep 03

On first booting the clock is always set back to the same time in the year 2001.(the default settings ?)

From your CMOS description (abstract below) this seems to match what is happening above.

"the unique integer stored in the CMOS's memory, if the number doesn't match then a checksum error occurs. To be safe the computer will normally return to default settings since it has no idea what the original settings were,"

As you all suggest,I will get a new battery and will post you the results,.......when ?
In the meantime thanks a lot guys.

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