Wireless access points - wired v electric circuit

  darrenhales 15:00 30 Apr 14
Locked

Looking to extend my wifi reach, and looking at a system that you plug into your mains and it will boost your signal, against having ethernet cable running through the house to access points.

Apart from the added cable, any pros/cons - is either system likely to give me a better signal, and if so by how much?

Thanks

  darrenhales 20:58 30 Apr 14

Sorry Andrew, I'm not sure what your reply was?

  onthelimit1 09:06 01 May 14

I've installed a number of TP-link wireless homeplug kits with good results. One of the benifits is the wireless plug can be moved to any room in the house where you want WiFi and, more than one can be used in 'difficult' houses. I use these.

  jamessmith 03:47 12 May 14

I just installed a Netgear powerline 200. I get half the mbps using the powerlines as I get from direct ethernet. This is the next room, same breaker box but different circuit.

  alanrwood 10:07 12 May 14

Ethernet is going to be intrinsically more reliable in the long run and also faster but it does take more installing but I would always prefer the simple solution to the more complex. Once it is in you can just forget it. Wired 5 rooms up several years ago and never had a problem. In the one room where I wanted wireless for the wife to connect via her smartphone I just connected the ethernet to a cheap dumb switch and ran a cable to a mains plug access point I bought for £12 from eBay. Also never had a problem.

  Secret-Squirrel 13:56 12 May 14

" I get half the mbps using the powerlines as I get from direct ethernet."

Something's not right. Is one or both plugged into a mains power strip? If so then that can severely affect performance so make sure, if possible, they're plugged directly into a mains wall socket.

  alanrwood 19:08 12 May 14

Hi SS

(It ain't) not necessarily so.

I regularly achieve 600Mb/s throughput using a GB ethernet connection. You would never get that using any mains carried system. You would be correct if you were only using 100Mb/s networking.

  Secret-Squirrel 19:55 12 May 14

"You would be correct if you were only using 100Mb/s networking."

That's what I assumed the OP's using. Obviously, he's never never going to achieve gigabit speeds with 200mbps adapters ;)

  TV-Repairman 20:20 12 May 14

Apparently, there are some issues with these devices - mostly interference to DAB/FM radio as well as shortwave radio. You might not be concerned but you could get a knock on your door.

click here

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