Why doesn't this work?

  Chegs ® 11:44 04 Oct 05
Locked

I have a laptop with wireless card installed,and a desktop with a wireless card installed.

The two can swap files/share internet via cables thru my Gateway,but as the Gateway only has one RJ45 connection(presently occupied by daughters PC)I bought a wireless card for my desktop with an idea of using THIS for the laptops P2P and sharing my connection.

I have succeeded in getting the two to declare they're connected via WiFi(icon on desktop states "connected" + icon on laptop states "connected") but trying to access eithers Network Neighbourhood icons produces a "The network path was not found" message on the desktop.

Tried to use XP's WiFi setup wizard,but the file it created to run on the laptop states this cannot be run on the laptop(wrong OS)

The desktop's running XP Home,the laptops on 98se.

The message "path not found" would indicate I'm close to getting filesharing working wirelessly(I think)but I'm blowed if I can work out why its doing this.

Whilst swapping IP addresses around to get the "connected" message last night,there suddenly appeared to be a major conflict somewhere,causing the desktop PC to totally lockup.As I had been trying all day previously,to get Acronis installed(to many partitions)I had caused all kinds of errors occuring on the desktop PC so restored from image,then cfg'ed the WiFi to get the "connected" message ballons on each PC.

The desktops set to "Get IP addy automatically" same with the laptop.Also tried manual cfg of IP but thats where the lockup started,so not keen on trying again(but will if it would work)

  Taran 12:18 04 Oct 05

Let's roll this back a bit to where you had (or suspected) that you had a live connection.

If you can achieve that state again, run the local machine ping 127.0.0.1 on each PC just to make certain that the TCP/IP stack is running properly on the machines.

Next logical step is to try to ping each PC address from the other - you know how to do this so for the sake of brevity I'll skip the steps involved.

Next point to check, open Internet Explorer and check your connection parameters using Tools >> Internet options >> Connections.

Make sure there are no remaining references to dial up or other previous connections that may be a legacy from your old setup.

Finally, and I hate to suggest this since i'm sure you'll have done it already, triple check that all machines have a unique name, that they are all on EXACTLY the same workgroup, and check which type of network connection the Windows 98 machine is set to log in as.

The simplest solution would be to buy a wireless router/gateway that can natively support ALL machines.

Internet Connection Sharing is likely to be your enemy here, not the base networking setup. The two are linked but not the same thing at all and getting two wireless PCs to connect and share an internet connection are not necessarily the same thing at all.

T

  Chegs ® 13:40 04 Oct 05

IP address on laptop is 192.168.1.6

IP address on Desktop is 169.254.142.73

Ping 127.0.0.1 on desktop gets a reply <1ms, same with laptop.

Ping from one to other gets "Request timed out"

Wired connection works,so network/computer names are correct(I checked the laptops to,just to be sure)Both are set as MSHOME(I used defaults until I get it working,then will change it)

Both WiFi cards are presently using "Ad-Hoc" as altering them to "Infrastructure" kills the (apparent)connection.This is a screenshot of Desktops LAN connection click here and this is the laptops icon popup click here

  Taran 14:06 04 Oct 05

And yet neither one is receiving data packets from the other, they are only sending.

I'm still tempted to say solve the headache and get a router that supports this or use wires with a small multi-port hub connected to the router's RJ45.

I hate wrestling with wireless...

*Ahem*

What happens on the XP box when you click 'View wireless networks' ?

Go back to any PC connected to the router.

Start >> Run >> cmd >> OK

Type :

ipconfig/all

You should see something like this:

Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.11

Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 194.74.65.69

62.6.40.178

Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : 04 October 2005 10:51:39

Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : 05 October
2005 10:51:39

I need to know the first two (Dhcp Enabled and Autoconfiguration Enabled) and your Default Gateway, DHCP Server, and DNS Servers.

I also need to know whether your router is wireless capable at all.

What is happening here is that you've asked two wireless network cards to obtain their addresses automatically.

Where do they get them from ?

Without a wireless device that DHCP's addresses the machines will more than likely default to their internal loopback address, so they can send till the cows come home but can't receive - possibly because they may even have defaulted to the same address.

For any chance of success, give each wireless computer a static IP address about 10 up from the machine connected to the router.

Give the default gateway and DNS server information as per the machine connected direct to the router.

It still may not work, but by doing that you are telling the computers where they are on the network and forcing them to look through the router connection for an Internet feed.

Can you also confirm whether one of the wireless machines is also the one connected via cable to the router. If so we may need some extra jiggery pokery since it is actually trying to route traffic through two connections.

Those ideas of a wireless router or wires and a 20 quid 8 port hub are starting to sound appealing right about now...

  Taran 14:14 04 Oct 05

Had I read your last post more thoroughly I'd not have typed out anywhere near as much junk above...

You mentioned:

IP address on laptop is 192.168.1.6

IP address on Desktop is 169.254.142.73

There's your problem.

IP addresses have to be the same bar the last octet.

If "IP address on laptop is 192.168.1.6" then IP address on Desktop must share all bar the last set of figures, like this:

192.168.1.xxx

Change the xxx to any number you like, but check with your router first to see the range it supports (some will cope with 10 addresses, some with 50, some with 100) and make sure the range its supports is not purely through DHCP.

So, if you had six computers you should give them all static IPs like this:

192.168.1.6

192.168.1.7

192.168.1.8

192.168.1.9

192.168.1.10

192.168.1.11

All of them will be able to communicate based on the fact that they are in the same IP range.

192.168.1.6 with 169.254.142.73 won't work since they are different IP address ranges, in effect, they are entirely different networks.

Incidentally make sure the Subnet Mask is 255.255.255.0 for any IP address starting 192.168.1.xxx

T

  Chegs ® 14:31 04 Oct 05

Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :


Description . . . . . . . . . . . :

Ralink RT2500 Wireless LAN Card


Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-0E-2E-52-35-0C


Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No


IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.8


Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0


Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

  Chegs ® 14:32 04 Oct 05

Does Dhcp need to be enabled?

  Taran 14:44 04 Oct 05

No, DHCP does not need to be enabled unless you want the card to get its IP address from a DHCP server. A router or gateway is normally a DHCP capable server (check your product documentation) and it can deliver an address when requested to by any computer or DHCP enabled device (network printers and so on).

Now, this is where we get silly.

The address information you posted above is different again to the details I was typing out previously.

Remember where I said 192.168.1.xxx ?

The IP address above is on another range:

192.168.0.8

So, let's take a step back here.

You rdefault gateway (the router) is on 192.168.0.1

Give each machine a static IP address as follows:

192.168.0.5

192.168.0.6

192.168.0.7

etc

Make sure all subnet masks are 255.255.255.0

Make sure all machines are looking at Default Gateway 192.168.0.1

That will at least put all machines on a common network addressing system which should, in theory at least, allow them to see one another.

Things to watch out for are those you have going at the moment.

All IP addresses have to be in the same range. All subnet masks need to be 255.255.255.0 for that particular IP address range. Default Gateway of 192.168.0.1 tells all devices to look for an internet feed through that address, which belongs to your router.

Set that up on all machines and see how yuo get along. Currently you stand no chance as long as you have machines on different IP address ranges.

  Chegs ® 15:05 04 Oct 05

Ok,I'm suffering a tad brainfry with several things occuring at once(not all PC related)


Here is a direct copy of all PC's presently on the Desktop...


Windows IP Configuration


Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : speedy


Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :


Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown


IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No


WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No


Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 2:


Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :


Description . . . . . . . . . : Actiontec Gateway


Physical Address. . . . . . . : 00-20-E0-0E-09-DA


Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes


Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes


IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.2


Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0


Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1


DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1


DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . : **.***.***.***
**.***.***.***(removed by me)


Lease Obtained. . . . : 04 October 2005 03:29:42


Lease Expires .. . . . : 05 October 2005 03:29:42


Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection:


Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :


Description . . : Ralink RT2500 Wireless LAN Card


Physical Address. . . . . . : 00-0E-2E-52-35-0C


Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No


IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.8


Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0


Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1

The Actiontec has a couple of laptop style slots in its side to add WiFi cards,but I'm not paying out upwards of £40 for an Actiontec brand card(as Actiontec stated it has to be their product to work,I tried another brand and emailed them when it didn't work)and it has to be the slower (b) specification.

  Taran 15:20 04 Oct 05

Checklist:

1. All machines on same IP Address range

2. All machines sharing the same Default Gateway information

3. All machines (other than the one cable connected direct to the router) should be on a static assigned IP address.

Yur current setup as detailed in your last post - does this allow communication/sharing/web access from both machines ?

  Forum Editor 15:35 04 Oct 05

Life's short.

Buy a wireless modem/router, set it up, and leave all these problems behind. The router's DCHP server will assign IP addresses to networked machines automatically, and you'll find your network will do just that - network.

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