whats the difference between hdd

  silas.b 17:47 15 Jun 03
Locked

Im looking to buy a new hard drive and find it confusing when i look at hard drive and some say
PCI IDE hard drive
SCSI hard drive

whats the difference between these drives with different names.
isnt a hard drive just a hard drive?

help would be appreciated.

and also any recommendations on a certain hard drive to buy.

cheers Guys and Gals!

  Lú-tzé 18:02 15 Jun 03

It depends on a few things:

a - type of connector - in this case, a scsi card is best avoided in a home pc, to my way of thinking. Usual connector is IDE. SCSI hdd run faster, but can be akward to set up at times.

2 - speed: go for 7200 rpm rahter than 5400 rpm.

  powerless 18:03 15 Jun 03

Simply put a hard drive is a hard drive as they store data.

But the connection of the hard drive to your computer is different.

Home PC's will use an IDE connection as its cheap and suits our needs perfectly. These types of hard drives have a speed of 5400rpm and 7200 rpm. The faster the speed generally the better performer.

They also have a cache buffer, 2MB and 8MB. A cache buffer is temproary storage space that holds information whilst the drive is being written to. A 8MB cache buffer is better as it gives a little more performance over a 2MB one.

Now a SCSI drive is meant for servers as the speeds of these drives are 10000rpm+ and the data can be wrriten and read from much quicker. It's a little over kill for the home user. There also more expensice.

Now a 7200, with 8MB cahe is just a little of the performance of a SCSI.

So i would say go for 7200rpm drive with a 8MB cache IDE drive and you can go wrong.

Drives to use? Western Digital, Maxtor... click here click here

There is also another type of hard drive called a Serial ATA (SATA) but if you click here you'll find many reviews and when i last read a review, there's nothing to jump about - no real gain in getting one of these drives. Also you would need a converter as the connector is different.

Any drive your thinking of buying pop the name in here click here and see what they say.

  Totally-braindead 18:07 15 Jun 03

You need to know whether your system uses IDE or SCSI, if you go to Control Panel in whichever version of windows you have and click on disk drives it should tell you. Most systems use IDE and yours probably does too, they're not as fast as SCSI but they are cheaper. So you see they are different, regarding a particular drive I've no real preference but make sure its a brand make such as Seagate, IBM or whatever and get a 7200 rpm drive they're quicker than the 5400 rpm ones and therefore you get the information of the drive quicker. Also buy a large hard drive, theres not much difference between say a 20 gig drive and a 40 gig so spend the extra pennies now.

  powerless 18:08 15 Jun 03

So i would say go for 7200rpm drive with a 8MB cache IDE drive and you can't go wrong.

and

Now a 7200rpm drive, with an 8MB cahe is just a little of the performance of a SCSI drive.

  Totally-braindead 18:10 15 Jun 03

I'm such a slow typist the others had answered your question before I'd finished typing my answer,and in a lot more detail too, well never mind.

  keith-236785 18:11 15 Jun 03

SPEED & PRICE

a scsi drive is faster but you need a scsi controller card (or a motherboard that supports it) they run at 10000 or 15000 rpm

An IDE drive is the Cheaper more standard drive, accepted by all motherboards but slower, 5400 or 7200 rpm

i won't recommend one as mostly they are all good (odd bad apple) i had a bad experience with a Seagate drive but i put that down to the supplier not the manufacturer, i still wont have a Seagate drive though, probably me being daft but.......

  silas.b 18:17 15 Jun 03

is it simple to set up a hard drive?

  silas.b 18:18 15 Jun 03

is there any limitations to how much GB my computer can take?
can i add as much GB hard drive as i please?

thanks for the help by the way guys.

  powerless 18:24 15 Jun 03

What operating system do you have and what size drive are you thinking of buying?

  silas.b 18:25 15 Jun 03

ive got windows xp and i was thinking of gettin an 80.

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