what size graphics card?

  pollpott 10:35 18 Apr 08
Locked

I am about to buy a laptop for the first time and am currently looking at the HP range between £500-£700. I want it for photoshop, music, watching DVDs and BBC i-player downloads, I dont play games. The machines I am looking at vary quite a lot in price for very little difference except that the graphics card seems to be a fairly big factor. For the uses I have specified will a 64bit card plus shared memory suffice?

  bremner 11:24 18 Apr 08

For that amount of money you can do much better than a meagre 64MB.

This Toshiba is in your range and is very well spec'd click here

  bremner 11:27 18 Apr 08

Even this Toshiba has 312MB of graphics for £450. click here

  DieSse 13:50 18 Apr 08

bremner - it wasn't 64MB grapics RAM - it was 64bit - which could be quite different.

pollpott - can you please give a model number or two so that we can look at them please.

  bremner 14:21 18 Apr 08

Thanks - you are quite right, missread the detail.

The cards in both of my links have 128bit graphics.

  pollpott 14:27 18 Apr 08

The machines I am looking at are from john lewis, the pavilion range models DV6710EA, DV670 and DV6699.Thanks for taking the trouble over this, much appreciated.

  pollpott 14:29 18 Apr 08

Its the 1st one which apparently is only 64bit

  pollpott 15:13 18 Apr 08

Ive done a bit more research and it would seem that it is 64mb not bit, sorry for the confusion

  bremner 15:24 18 Apr 08

What I said in my first post stands. Today 64MB is meagre and there are very good deals as I have linked to, that give much more for your money.

  DieSse 19:16 18 Apr 08

The problem (?) with assessing graphics in low cost laptops is the wide variety of options. There is normally dedicated memory, plus shared memory.

So, for instance the DV6710EA is specified at "up to 559MB total graphics memory - this will be part dedicated, part shared (ie taken out of system RAM when needed.

Whereas the DV6799EA has Up to 1023 MB Total Available Graphics Memory with 256 MB
dedicated. Plus a better processor, and maybe other things too.

It's a nightmare to pick up all the possible variations, spot all the differences, then balance that against the prices and what's in stock.

And they're all probably pretty good too. It's still fairly true to say, though you get what you pay for - pay more get better, pay less get less, by and large.

What you want to do with it, to me, doesn't shout out high performance - so I would set myself a price I can afford - then check off different systems in that price range for the best spec.

OR - write down a modest spec, and see how cheap you can get it for.

  pollpott 14:06 19 Apr 08

thanks a lot DieSse, I think youre right you get what you pay for and you never know I might get into gaming at some point so I might as well go for a decent spec in the first place. Cheers

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