What is this obsession with analogue to DVD

  pj123 16:48 17 Apr 04
Locked

This subject is appearing almost daily now in the Helproom. Every time I see one I refer it back to previous threads, but we never seem to get any feedback on whether it solved the problem or not. Please let us know if responses to previous threads have been of use to you.

  Sir Radfordin 16:55 17 Apr 04

Perhaps they all come to their senses and realise it is too much hassle ;)

  pj123 17:13 17 Apr 04

Sir Radfordin. Good point, but I haven't got any sense. I am in the process of copying all my old Beta tapes to DVD and, as you say, too much hassle. It takes at least 5 hours to get a 2 hour tape on to DVD. I have found a company who will do the transfer at £10 a tape, regardless of format or length. But I have at least 120 Beta tapes and that is a lot of money. So I will "percy vere".

  Sir Radfordin 17:35 17 Apr 04

I know someone who needs to blank 3000 Beta tapes and found a company to do it for 50pence a tape. Bargain! Then worked out that the machine (degauser) could be bought for the same amount...and you'd have something to show for it at the end of the day!

  SEASHANTY 19:57 17 Apr 04

On the standalone DVD recorders such as Philips,
Panasonic, Pioneer. Sony etcetera it takes just the time of the video to transfer either VHS or Betamax.
You record in real time direct to DVD disc. i.e. a
3 hour VHS tape takes 3 hours a 4 hour tape 4 hours. Many of these machines will record 1, 2, 4, 6 and even 8 hours on a 4.7GB DVD recordable. You set the
time according to the quality you want. There is not much point however, in recording a VHS/Beta tape (which is analogue) in DVD quality. I wonder why people bother transferring analogue tape onto the hard disc only to record it back again to DVD disc.
click here

  Pamy 22:17 17 Apr 04

Seashanty, would you please expand your comment about recording analogue tape to HD only to record back to DVD.

My VHS tape recoder is is at the end of its life and I do not think it wise to buy a replacement, soI am considering buying a DVD recoder. I have a number of VHS/SVHS recordings that I would like to be able to look at in the future so I think I nead to put them onto DVD disk.
What would you recommend me to do for future veiwing.

  Pamy 22:18 17 Apr 04

Seashanty, would you please expand your comment about recording analogue tape to HD only to record back to DVD.

My VHS tape recoder is is at the end of its life and I do not think it wise to buy a replacement, soI am considering buying a DVD recoder. I have a number of VHS/SVHS recordings that I would like to be able to look at in the future so I think I nead to put them onto DVD disk.
What would you recommend me to do for future veiwing.

  josie mayhem 23:37 17 Apr 04

Sometimes it's Just Because you can!

But sometimes when the tape near to it end, and then again it could because of purisum.


I've tranfered some of my husband vinyl to cd for him, and reduced some of the hissing and crackling, he was pleased in one way, but it didn't like cleaning up as he said, that all the hissing ect, where all part of the recording!

And last and not least, well sometimes you have to find something to justify why you've got to get a new processor/computer or add more memory?

  SEASHANTY 00:02 18 Apr 04

If you need to transfer VHS tapes to DVD then do it the simplest way. By using a standalone DVD recorder
either with a combined HDD or not, you can record your VHS tapes direct to 4.7GB DVD recordable discs without recording them to the HDD first. This is normally quicker than recording VHS tapes to the PC HDD first as video files then recording them to DVD
disc from the hard drive. You will need your video recorder for playback of the VHS to do this either way. You can also frecord TV progs direct to DVD disc with these standalone recorders. If you eventually intend getting rid of all video tapes then you need to purchase a standalone DVD recorder which contains, additionally, a hard drive and these tend to be more expensive. I transfer my old VHS tapes to DVD-R in real time using the LP setting on my Panasonic DMR-E60 which gives me 4 hours recording on a single 4.7GB DVD-R. If the tapes have commercials I edit these out by pressing the pause button on the Panasonic
recorder. Pressing pause again carries on the recording - which is seamless. Doing it this way you don't need a video capture card or PC software. All you need is a blank DVD disc and a scart lead to connect the VCR scart to one of the DVD recorders scart sockets. The E60 I have is being replaced in May by the E65 (which will give up to 8 hours recording on a 4.7GB disc - lower
quality). I find the 4 hours LP setting on my machine quite adequate for VHS transfers.

  Pamy 10:34 18 Apr 04

Thanks seashanty for the explanation, that is how my hubby used to edit our pictures years ago using two vhs video recorders.
I only have a DVD player, but I suppose we will all have to buy DVD recorders soon. Better hope that the vhs recorder lasts.

Pamy

  GANDALF <|:-)> 10:38 18 Apr 04

You can buy VHS recorders for £29.99. When my present recorder deceases I'll be buying one of these.....and they will probbably be even cheaper;-)))

G

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