Using XP Compressed Folders

  WightRob 10:27 27 Aug 07
Locked

My PC is running XP Pro.
I had it built by a local computer shop.
It came with evaluation copies of WinZip and WinRar compression programs pre-installed.
As XP has a compression utility, I deceided to use this.
According to the XP help files, the "Create Compressed Folder" option is removed from the File menu and Right Click menu when a third party compression program is installed.
I have uninstalled WinZip and WinRar and rebooted but the "Create Compressed Folder" still does not appear.
Does anyone know how I can solve this?

  GANDALF <|:-)> 10:32 27 Aug 07

Click on Start -> Run. Enter the following command in the Run text box
regsvr32 %windir%\system32\zipfldr.dll

G

  WightRob 10:45 27 Aug 07

Thanks for your very quick response Gandalf.
I ran the command and got a popup window labelled RegSvr32 stating "DllRegisterServer in C:\WINDOWS\system32\zipfldr.dll succeeded".
I rebooted afterwards, but the option is still not there?
Any other ideas?
Rob

  GANDALF <|:-)> 10:58 27 Aug 07

click here and try number 85 'Restore Compressed Zipped Folders Association', although I suspect it may be the same as the command line.

G

  WightRob 20:31 28 Aug 07

I'm not absolutely sure what I need to do with the data you pointed me to Gandalf. I checked the registry entries that were listed against my registry. They all seem to coincide. Although for the first one: [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\.zip]
"PerceivedType"="compressed"
@=""
I am not sure what the @="" refers to.
Can anyone help me out with this or with my original query?

  Jak_1 20:49 28 Aug 07

It all depends upon why you want to compress folders, not a lot of space is going to be gained! However if you want to compress a folder so you can send it by email etc then winrar is one of the better ones. Your evaluation copy should still continue to work after the trial period has elapsed, mine does. Winrar will open winzip folders but not vice versa. If you have the prog on a cd then re-install it if not then see here :

click here

  WightRob 10:01 29 Aug 07

Thanks for your reply Jak_1. As you guess, I want to send a bunch of photos by email. However I want to avoid third party software for 2 reasons.
1. I am trying to keep my machine lean and clean. If Windows does it OK then I will avoid loading extra software.
2. As you say, some zipped files will not open with software that it was not zipped on. Everyone I know uses XP so they should be able to open my zipped files.

As it happens, I have found a work around. The Send To Compressed Folder function works OK. So I can send one file to a compressed folder to create the folder then add files to it.

If anyone knows the solution to my original question, I would still like to know how to sort it.
Rob

  Jak_1 13:14 29 Aug 07

Winrar has now virtually become the standard for compressing files, far superior to windows own file compression and takes very little space. I do not understand your reluctance in using a superior 3rd party program however!
Should you eventually decide to use winrar then the recipient of the file will need winrar also in order to open the files.
As to your original question, this is from the MS help section:

To compress a file or folder on an NTFS drive
Open My Computer.
Double-click a drive or folder.
Right-click the file or folder you want to compress, and then click Properties.
On the General tab, click Advanced.
Select the Compress contents to save disk space check box, and then click OK.
In the Properties dialog box, click OK.
In Confirm Attribute Changes, select the option you want.
Notes

To open My Computer, click Start, and then click My Computer.
You can only use NTFS compression for files and folders on drives formatted as NTFS. If the Advanced button does not appear, the file or folder you selected is not on an NTFS drive.
If you move or copy a file into a compressed folder, it is compressed automatically. If you move a file from a different NTFS drive into a compressed folder, it is also compressed. However, if you move a file from the same NTFS drive into a compressed folder, the file retains its original state, either compressed or uncompressed.
Files and folders that are compressed using NTFS compression cannot be encrypted.
You can choose to display NTFS-compressed files in a different color. For more information, click Related Topics.
Related Topics

  WightRob 07:26 31 Aug 07

Thanks for your follow up Jak.
I understand your comments regarding the superiority of WinRar over Windows components. I am certainly no big fan of Windows and it's bundled apps. The issue this time is that I am sending a bunch of photos from a family event to non tech savvy family members. If I were to start asking them to download and install compression programs, they would not even try. Hence the desire to use standard Windows functions.
Rob

  brundle 08:04 31 Aug 07

Never seen the menu option you describe, the usual method is to right click your files, select SendTo/Compressed (zipped) Folder.
You won't see much reduction if you're compressing jpegs, best to resize them if they're huge. Right click image(s), select SendTo/Mail Recipient - you'll be given the option to resize them before they're sent.

click here

  WightRob 09:30 31 Aug 07

Brundle,
These are the notes from the XP Help Subject "Create a zipped compressed folder" that I was following.

To create a zipped compressed folder
Open My Computer.
Double-click a drive or folder.
On the File menu, point to New, and then click Compressed (zipped) Folder.
Type a name for the new folder, and then press ENTER.

There was also an additional note to say that this option is disabled if 3rd party compression software is installed. It was this function that I as trying to reinstate.

Thanks for the tip regarding Send to Mail Recipient. It's not something I have used before.
Do you know if there is a drop in quality, if the pictures are re-enlarged for printing at he other end? I guess that there will be.

Another option I am considering to distribute these photos (a family wedding) is to upload them to one of these sites where people with a password can view and download them. Does anyone have any information on these?

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Surface Pro (2017) vs Surface Pro 4

20 groundbreaking 3D animation technologies coming to Siggraph 2017

iPad Pro 12.9 vs Surface Pro 5