coolkishan 17:03 05 Aug 05

I have overclocked my pentium 4 prescott processor from 3.0ghz to 3.11ghz and it seems stable. I have not increased the voltage at all and wam increasin in increments of 0.015ghz. Im planning to go to 3.2ghz does anyone ahve any idea when i should increase the voltage?
I have a Thermalright SP-94 With a Vantec Tornado 92mm case fan :p.

  coolkishan 17:20 05 Aug 05



  ACOLYTE 17:38 05 Aug 05

I have no idea about overclocking as i have never done any,but it would seem to me that the 0.2ghz you get from overclocking is not worth the risk for such a tiny amount and the danger not only to the cpu but also to the pc,you could probably have brought a 3.2ghz cpu for not much more than the 3.0ghz you have now and saved yourself the hassle.

  helmetshine 17:41 05 Aug 05

I'm not really into overclocking but i don't believe there's a set level to increase the voltage at.

From the small increments you're making i'm assuming you're doing it by upping the FSB....if so you're not just overclocking the processor but everything else connected to it as well...your RAM,graphics card....so be very careful about the temperatures of all components not just the processor, especially if you do increase voltages as well.The processor will probably cut out before it reaches a temperature high enough to damage it....not too sure your ram and graphics card would tho.

  SANTOS7 17:44 05 Aug 05

The vagaries of overclocking are many and to do what you are doing with a 3ghz processor i will be surprised if you see any diference at all, cooling your PC down and optomising your Operating system would be a safer alternative

  herc182 17:47 05 Aug 05

no clue about overclocking but agree with alcolyte that it aint worth the hassle for the performance "leap" you wont get out of it. but whatever, you dont wanna hear that. what i wanted to give you is a link to is "speedfan" which will give you temperatures on all your components so that you know when you are pushing them too far ;-)

click here

  Completealias 18:25 05 Aug 05

I am no expert on overclocking haven't even tried it but from what I have read you continue to up the bus speed and if the system stops being stable you can then try to increase the voltage to the chip. This should then stable out the system again if not then you should return the voltage to normal and reduce the bus speed until stable and leave it at that.

Again from what I have read keeep the increaments small and run them for a while to make sure it is stable and keep an eye on system temperatures.

As far as the bonuses of oc'ing I aggree it does seem like a risk to take but an article I was reading on the subject stated that when a processor manufacturer switches to a new core design the speed that that is implemented at is a good indication of how far you can push a chip with the same manufacturing process.

As I said though have never tried myself I couldn't live without my comp.

  Chegs ® 18:45 05 Aug 05

You use the voltage increase to try to retain stabilty,usually you only need to increase the volts once you have "maxed out" the FSB.Personally,I wouldn't bother with OC,as its pointless running the risk for (at best)10% increase.Modern systems are sufficiently quick in standard form,I haven't noticed any dicernable differences between my previous CPU(XP1800)and present(XP2600)Adding extra RAM produced the most noticable improvement,especially as I switched from SDRAM to DDR at the same time as I changed from 512Mbs to 1.5Gbs.

  woodchip 18:49 05 Aug 05

It's not just the CPU you want to watch. It's the Mobo and Graphics card also as these will be working faster than they are designed to

  Completealias 18:51 05 Aug 05

Have alook at this click here and search the forum with the keyword overclocking would post a link but don't seem to be working for me at the mo

  Completealias 18:52 05 Aug 05

click here that should work

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