Upgrading my CPU, or RAM ! Help!

  QUIGGS2001 01:19 AM 24 Nov 11
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Hello, Im just a n00b, and Im not 100% sure if I know what I need to do regarding my old-ish desktop. Its getting slower (with daily tasks like opening new windows and playing tracks on media player), and I know for sure my CPU is out-dated. Im currently running 2GB of DDR2 RAM, but would like to jump to 4GB.

Ive got my eye on these on Amazon:

  • Intel E6700 Pentium Dual-Core Processor - 3.20GHz, 2MB Cache, Socket 775.
  • Kingston HyperX Genesis 4G 1066Mhz Non ECC Kit4 Module.

Dont wana blow a fortune, as I only use my desktop for daily things, nothing major. Below I will provide the current specs of my desktop. What I wana know is, could I simply plug-n-play the above items with my current set-up, or do I need to replace motherboards etc?!!

Operating System: 6.0-6002-Service Pack 2 Number of processors in system: 1 Current processor: #1 Active cores per processor: 2 Disabled cores per processor: 0 Processor Name: Intel(R) Celeron(R) CPU E1200 @ 1.60GHz Type: 0 Family: 6 Model: F Stepping: D Revision: A3 Maximum CPUID Level: A L1 Instruction Cache: 2 x 32 KB L1 Data Cache: 2 x 32 KB L2 Cache: 512 KB Packaging: LGA775 Enhanced Intel SpeedStep(R) Technology: Yes MMX(TM): Yes Intel(R) SSE: Yes Intel(R) SSE2: Yes Intel(R) SSE3: Yes Intel(R) SSE4: No Intel(R) AES-NI: No Intel(R) AVX: No Enhanced Halt State: Yes Execute Disable Bit: Yes Intel(R) Hyper-Threading Technology: No Intel(R) 64 Architecture: Yes Intel(R) Virtualization Technology: No Expected Processor Frequency: 1.60 GHz Reported Processor Frequency: 1.60 GHz Expected System Bus Frequency: 800 MHz Reported System Bus Frequency: 800 MHz

Packard Bell BV Model: MCP73VT-PM North Bridge: NVIDIA GeForce 7050 Revision A2 South Bridge: NVIDIA nForce 610i Revision A2 Max CPU Speed 1600 MHz Maximum Memory Capacity 16384 MHz

  Batch 09:13 AM 24 Nov 11

According to this:

Mobo details

Your motherboard supports DDR2 667/533/400 RAM

So for memory I suggest you go for:

2 x 2GB DDR2 PC2-5300/667MHz CL5 1.8V Non-ECC Unbuffered 240 pin

The 667MHz RAM is backwards compatible with the slower 533MHz and 400MHz RAm and is just as cheap (if not cheaper).

But before you splash out on RAM, why don't you open Task Manager and see if your PC is swapping out to disk (much / at all). If the swapping is minimal / non-existent, then upgrading the memory won't achieve anything.

You might find that tidying up your existing software installations (i.e. uninstalling gumf that you don't use / need) will help.

Also, search these forums for other postings where folks have suffered performance probs. There's often some useful advice (esp. from Fruit Bat).

  gengiscant 09:14 AM 24 Nov 11

AS your motherboard is quite old it can be difficult to check for CPU compatibility on many older OEM boards. You have to gamble on a CPU upgrade. As you have given the motherboard model number (MCP73VT) as opposed to the Packard Bell model number I cannot go and have a look on their website to see what CPU's are supported.

I am assuming that your PC is an Packard Bell i media but will have some numbers to tell you what model it is. Can you have a look for these and post them here?

  QUIGGS2001 17:21 PM 25 Nov 11

Thanks for responses guys! Its an iMedia B2216, X86-Based PC. Bios Version/Date: American Megatrends Inc. PBDV10.P18, 10/9/2008.

  QUIGGS2001 17:36 PM 25 Nov 11

Batch, you say the 667MHz RAM is backwards compatible with the slower 533MHz and 400MHz RAm and is just as cheap (if not cheaper).

But I only have two RAM slots, so I would be throwing away my old RAM once I buy the new, so should I worry about the new RAM being backward compatible? Or is that a silly question. Reason I ask is because I spotted these on Amazon:

Kingston Value Ram 800Mz DDR2 NonECC CL5 2GB DIMM

( http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kingston-Value-800Mz-DDR2-NonECC/dp/B000Z2GO2Q/ref=reghu-rdadd1dp )

Could I go for this, as a possibly quick and cost effective solution?

  lotvic 19:38 PM 25 Nov 11

Will this upgrading of CPU cause the OEM XP(?) operating system to throw a wobbly? or will that be alright?

  Batch 09:01 AM 26 Nov 11

By backwards compatible, it means compatible with what the motherboard can handle.

So if you put 667 memory in to a mobo that can only run at 533 or 400, the 667 will still work, but just at the best speed supported by the mobo.

Also, if your mobo will handle 667 and you put, say, a 667 and a 400 strip in, it will all run at the slower speed. In your case, if you are replacing all of the memory, you don't need to concern yourself with this aspect. it will all run at the mobo speed.

Although the mobo spec states 667 / 533 / 400, it is common for some variants of a mobo to support only some of the specified speeds (e.g. one variant might support 667/533/400 and another might just support 533 and 400. So if you go for 667 you will get the best result with having to concern yourself with what (of these 3 speeds) YOUR actual mobo supports.

But as I said before:

"But before you splash out on RAM, why don't you open Task Manager and see if your PC is swapping out to disk (much / at all). If the swapping is minimal / non-existent, then upgrading the memory won't achieve anything."

  QUIGGS2001 02:12 AM 28 Nov 11

But as I said before:

"But before you splash out on RAM, why don't you open Task Manager and see if your PC is swapping out to disk (much / at all). If the swapping is minimal / non-existent, then upgrading the memory won't achieve anything."

Sorry, I dont actually know where to look for this within Task Manager to check if its happening or not. lol. Im no expert :$

  QUIGGS2001 02:16 AM 28 Nov 11

Will this upgrading of CPU cause the OEM XP(?) operating system to throw a wobbly? or will that be alright?

My OEM OS is Vista. Can anyone adivise if I can upgrade my CPU?

I had my eye on this:

Intel E6700 Pentium Dual-Core Processor - 3.20GHz, 2MB Cache, Socket 775

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Intel-E6700-Pentium-Dual-Core-Processor/dp/B003N9JWZ4/ref=sr11?ie=UTF8&qid=1322446471&sr=8-1

  Batch 10:01 AM 28 Nov 11

Open up Task Manager (CTL+ALT+DEL) and go to the Performance tab and see how much memory is:

a) recognised as being installed.

b) being used / has been used since boot up.

The relevant figures from Task Manager are:

Physical Memory:

Total = the amount of physical memory installed

Available = free physical memory (i.e. currently unused).

Commit Charge:

Total = your current physical memory + swap space (on disk) use

Peak = your highest (since boot) physical memory + swap space use

It is this last (Peak) one that is of interest, as if the value is below the Physical Total (or rarely goes much above it), then you aren't swapping (much) and so adding more memory would be pointless.

BTW, an observation. Ask yourself if you aren't that familiar with these things, are you proficient to swap critical internal parts?

  robin_x 10:08 AM 28 Nov 11

If you get any problems with the Licence Key, a Freephone number should come up and you just ring it, explain you have changed major components and quote your old key.

They'll give you a new number.

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