Unsecured network

  Quickbeam 12:24 11 Feb 09
Locked

I've just got 2 laptops connected together on a wireless network, but the system says it's unsecured.

How do I go about securing this? I've followed the help files, but I don't understand too much of the geek speak.

  recap 12:57 11 Feb 09

Hopefully if you click here
it will explain it more to you Quickbeam.

  Quickbeam 07:52 12 Feb 09

Not a fire wall problem.

It's now enabled (security enabled wireless network (WPA)) but I'm not sure what I did.

However, it's now asking for a security key that I can't remember seeing, so now I cant access it at all.

  mgmcc 08:42 12 Feb 09

The "key" you are being prompted for is the one you created and entered in the router's security settings when you enabled WPA. If you don't recall what it was then, while connected to the router by ethernet cable, *NOT WIRELESSLY*, go back into the settings and check what it is. Some routers "mask" the key with dots or asterisks, in which case you would need to create a new key and make a note of it. You then enter this key in the PC when connecting "wirelessly" to the router.

  Quickbeam 12:02 12 Feb 09

Just been looking for this but I'm not sure where I should be looking as I don't see it. I'm new to Vista so it's not as easy as XP to find my way around it.

  KremmenUK 12:17 12 Feb 09

There are 2 levels to wireless security, the SSID and the WEP/WPA key.

Normally this is initially setup on the router itself. The SSID IMO, once set, should be setup to not broadcast if your router allows this.

The second area is the WEP/WPA. Try to avoid using WEP as this was cracked last year and is not as secure as WPA.

If possible use the latest WPA2 if your router supports that as well.

Once the router is configured you should be able to connect to the secured router quite easily by entering the SSID and WEP/WPA key when requested.

Can't help with Vista as I'm avoiding that currently in favour of my trusty XP.

  mgmcc 12:19 12 Feb 09

It isn't Vista that you need to be looking at, it is the settings within the ROUTER.

Open your PC's web browser and type in the Router's IP address (something like 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 etc) and this will open the router's configuration pages.

  Quickbeam 12:25 13 Feb 09

I've been here before in the past and failed... Where do I get this IP Address from? All that's on the back of it is a bar code & number.

  mgmcc 13:29 13 Feb 09

In the PC, open a Command Prompt window ("Start > Run", type CMD and click OK) and, at the prompt, type...

ipconfig /all

...and press Enter. This will show details of all network adapters in the PC. Look for the *DEFAULT GATEWAY* address in the details of an adapter that is connected to the router - that is the router's IP address.

  Quickbeam 13:58 13 Feb 09

I've spent days trying to get this to work by myself, without any help... I should have just asked straight away!

Thanks a lot, it's all hunky dory with security enabled now:)

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