UK Power Supplys.

  splatter 22:49 10 May 06
Locked

On behalf of my cousin who just got back from Canada:

While she was away studying she bought a dell laptop. As it was bought over there it came with a daft AC power adapter, which obviously works on a different voltage. Now, if she was to get a new UK AC Adapter, would she:

1. Be able to do that (ie use a British 240v on the laptop)

2. Would she also need a new battery?

cheers,
Jay

  Fingees 22:56 10 May 06

Will not need a new battery.

Check the existing power supply, as they are sometimes universal, and automatically adjust to the mains voltage, unlike the old fashioned type that had to be switched over ..


All the best

  FatboySlim71 23:00 10 May 06

Some adaptors though can work on different voltages, if you look on the adaptor and see if you can see any mention of it showing 240v, if it does then it should be ok to use in the uk and the battery should as well, you will probably need to get a convertor as if I remember right, plugs from over there have two prongs. Beware though if you need to buy an adaptor as Dell can be a law to the themselves when it comes to accessories/peripherals, as a lot of these are only available from Dell at Dell prices.

  Stuartli 23:01 10 May 06

It could be worth checking the specification in the laptop's manual - as pointed out laptops more often than not come with the ability to use different power supplies and voltages.

The reason, of course, is that their portability and usefulness means business people and other travellers take them abroad.

  Forum Editor 23:04 10 May 06

within the past few years she'll have no problem - she can use a UK Dell charger. The machine will use the transformed current from the charger without any difficulty.

  rodriguez 23:34 10 May 06

If you look on the back of the charger there will be a label stating the voltage and frequency that it is designed to run on. The USA and Canada use 110 volt and 60 Hz, the UK uses 230-240 volt and 50 Hz. If the label on the back says 100-240v 50/60 Hz then everything is fine and she will just need a UK 3 pin plug or an adapter that converts US 2 pin plugs to UK 3 pin. If the label just says 110v 60 Hz she will also need a voltage converter.

  splatter 23:40 10 May 06

cheers guys, I'll be seeing her tomorrow so I will check it all out.

  Stuartli 09:08 11 May 06

Just as a follow up I've just had a Maplins e-mail newsletter with these links (if, by any chance, you do need a power supply):

click here

and

click here

  rmcqua 10:16 11 May 06

The vast majority of laptop power supplies these days will accept a wide range of input voltages, typically 100 - 240 Volts, which includes European and N.American power. The manufacturers realise that laptop users often travel and need to have power flexibility without the hassle of separate PSUs.

  splatter 07:26 12 May 06

Hi all. Still not had a chance to check out the power supply, but when I spoke to her last night she had gone to maplin's her self and bought one of the transormers that Stuartli mentioned (the bigger one).

Thanks all, and thanks from my cuz as well.

Jay

  rmcqua 19:43 12 May 06

Oh well, she probably didn't need to buy one but never mind, if it works.

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