Twin hard drives as one

I have 2 identical 160GB hard drives. I have heard that people make them as one so its faster etc.. How do I go about this please?

  Diodorus Siculus 18:33 07 Apr 08

That's called RAID

click here for how to set it up with various options.

  Diodorus Siculus 18:33 07 Apr 08

click here for correct link to page one.

  UncleP 20:59 07 Apr 08

A word of warning for your consideration: the reference given by Diodorus Siculus is very good - clear, detailed and covering most aspects of the construction and application of PC RAID systems. In my opinion, however, it tends to overstate the advantage of improved speed and neglect the disadvantages of RAID0 arrays.

In real-world tests (as opposed to theoretical calculations), the speed advantage for most applications is barely detectable, including games for example, where you might expect to see a significant improvement. This is generally due to the fact that other factors play a significant role. There are indeed applications where a gain of up to around 40%, depending on the RAID controller used, can be achieved but these are relatively few and far between.

The main disadvantage of RAID0 is that it is not a genuine RAID system - no redundancy - and the data is striped across both disks. So if a fault affects one of the HDs, you lose all of the stored contents. Moreover, it is very difficult to recover data from the failed array - a job for the professionals only, at considerable expense. So it is essential that every file of any importance is backed up regularly and reliably (not that you shouldn't do this for any storage system, but many users seem to rely on data recovery techniques which at least stand a chance of working for normal and RAID1 HDs).

  woodchip 21:10 07 Apr 08

Raid is not necessarily faster, read this for problems you can have. click here

  woodchip 21:35 07 Apr 08

You could use twin as one by making partition cover both drives. So it looked like one

  DieSse 22:34 07 Apr 08

To the best of my knowledge, the only way to span a partition over two drives is to use RAID0.

But the speed advantages are largely illusory.

You're much better off using one drive for regular use, and the other for backups. Even better if you take one drive out and put it into an external drive box, which you can keep safe.

I see people all the time - so often it gets boring - who haven't developed a sensible backup routine. That's FAR more important than anything else you can do with two drives.

  woodchip 23:40 07 Apr 08

That's the way I would do it

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