Text Definition Problem

  SABRE 16:25 21 Oct 03
Locked

Just had two PC's upgraded to Win 2000 from Win 98, together with upgraded motherboards, processors etc. Since done though, normal screen text looks 'orrible, especially when writing a Word doc. It doesn't look solid, and lacks real definition. Is this a Win 2000 trait or could it be the motherbaord with an on-board graphics card perhaps that is not up to scratch?
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

  Djohn 16:47 21 Oct 03

Usually it's the other way round with XP or 2000. Text is very clear and crisp. If using a TFT monitor try "Clear Type", if a CRT, then "Standard".

Right click on desktop, choose properties/appearances/effects, and you will see a drop-down menu. Choose one or the other from there. j.

  Diemmess 17:27 21 Oct 03

Recently had to reinstall bog standard Arial which had somehow been lost from daughter/grandson's PC.

Every version of Arial was still there except the basic one.
Probably not the situation for you, but it threw my small brain for a while to find ISP screens and several others looking very untidy, like an old nine segment character display.

  SABRE 10:00 22 Oct 03

Tried suggestions but prob. still exists. In a word document the text on screen looks like a printer that is running out of ink. The graphics is an S3 Graphics Pro. It may be because the PC was built by our PC support company and that as it is for office use, they may have used lower grade components. Any more ideas?

  Elyvate 13:52 23 Oct 03

Have you tried changing screen resolutions?

  SABRE 07:52 24 Oct 03

....and not what I expected. The whole PC was upgraded but not the monitor. It is a 17" CRT and after the motherboard/onboard graphics upgrade, one would have expected it to perhaps display even better. But no, it was worse that it was before (which was OK). Problem proved by replacing it with a newer CRT and now text appears fine. It was definitely an eye strain before.
Wierd really!!

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