tcp vs udp

  bythor 10:31 30 May 10
Locked

Hi. I need the help of someone who knows a bit about tcp/udp on this one I think. I currently send serial data via a digi one sp to a tcp address. I hope to send the same serial data to two addresses, however one of them only accepts tcp whilst the other will accept tcp or udp. It doesn't look like I can send the data to both desitinations from the digi one, and I just don't know enough about the subject. Any ideas how I can send to both, without forking out silly money?
thanks for reading.

  mgmcc 20:56 30 May 10

When you say you are sending data to a TCP address, are you actually sending it to an IP address using TCP protocol, with the option of using UDP protocol?

If so, and this is only guesswork, you *MIGHT* be able to send to multiple devices by sending to either the Subnet address or the Broadcast address.

If your router's address is 192.168.1.1 then the Subnet address (not the Subnet *MASK* address) is 192.168.1.0 and the Broadcast address is 192.168.1.255

  bythor 21:14 30 May 10

thanks for your response. Yes, I'm sending to a TCP address. They (recipient 1) have told me that they don't work with UDP.
Recipient 2 can receive either tcp or udp.
1 and 2 are different (competing) companies. Does this help to explain anything?

  manifestmktg 12:36 02 Jun 10

Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is one of the core protocols of the Internet Protocol Suite. TCP operates at a higher level, concerned only with the two end systems, for example a Web browser and a Web server. In particular, TCP provides reliable, ordered delivery of a stream of bytes from a program on one computer to another program on another computer. Besides the Web, other common applications of TCP include e-mail and file transfer. Among other management tasks, TCP controls segment size, flow control, and data exchange rate. While, the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is one of the core members of the Internet Protocol Suite, the set of network protocols used for the Internet. With UDP, computer applications can send messages, in this case referred to as datagrams, to other hosts on an Internet Protocol (IP) network without requiring prior communications to set up special transmission channels or data paths. UDP uses a simple transmission model without implicit hand-shaking dialogues for guaranteeing reliability, ordering, or data integrity. Thus, UDP provides an unreliable service and datagrams may arrive out of order, appear duplicated, or go missing without notice.

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  manifestmktg 12:37 02 Jun 10

Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is one of the core protocols of the Internet Protocol Suite. TCP operates at a higher level, concerned only with the two end systems, for example a Web browser and a Web server. In particular, TCP provides reliable, ordered delivery of a stream of bytes from a program on one computer to another program on another computer. Besides the Web, other common applications of TCP include e-mail and file transfer. Among other management tasks, TCP controls segment size, flow control, and data exchange rate. While, the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is one of the core members of the Internet Protocol Suite, the set of network protocols used for the Internet. With UDP, computer applications can send messages, in this case referred to as datagrams, to other hosts on an Internet Protocol (IP) network without requiring prior communications to set up special transmission channels or data paths. UDP uses a simple transmission model without implicit hand-shaking dialogues for guaranteeing reliability, ordering, or data integrity. Thus, UDP provides an unreliable service and datagrams may arrive out of order, appear duplicated, or go missing without notice.

  bythor 19:39 02 Jun 10

Thanks for that explanation, very clear (twice ;->).
So do you think there's a product that will send the same serial data to two tcp addresses?

  mgmcc 09:11 03 Jun 10

I believe manifestmktg's posting was copied/pasted from somewhere like "Wikipedia" primarily so that the marketing URLs could be appended, i.e. basically SPAM.

As far as I'm aware, there is no such thing as a "TCP address". TCP (Total Control Protocol) and UDP (User Datagram Protocols) are methods used to transmit data. The address to which the data is sent is the "IP address".

I would have thought that whether or not you can send data to more than one recipient (IP address) will depend on the options available in the software from which you're sending the data. The "Digi One SP" appears only to provide ethernet connectivity from an RS232 Serial Port.

  bythor 18:14 03 Jun 10

thanks again. Yes, the Digi has one serial port, but that's fine. I want to send the same serial data to two different addresses that use tcp. The digi can send via either tcp or udp, but not both. I therefore need a solution to send the serial data to two separate ip addresses via tcp. I would have thought that if the Digi can send to one, there must be a device that can send to two, but this is where I hoped the forum would shed some light on such a product.

  mgmcc 19:36 03 Jun 10

I don't understand what you're actually trying to do. For example, if I send an email to someone, I am sending data via TCP to an IP address (a DNS server will resolve the email address to the recipient mail server's IP address). I can, of course, sent that same email to several recipients (IP addresses) simultaneously.

Now that's a fairly simplistic example, but why can't the *software* you're using to send the data deliver it to more than one IP address? I wouldn't have thought that additional hardware would be necessary to achieve that.

  bythor 13:25 04 Jun 10

I don't think it's software that doing the send bit. The digi one can only send via tcp to one ip address. It will send via udp to multiple address, but one of the addresses I'm sending to doesn't accept the udp protocol/format. So all I'm left with is a digi that will either sent via tcp or udp but not both. So, it seems that, for physical limitations in the digi, sending the data via tcp can be to only one single address.

  mgmcc 20:29 04 Jun 10

What are you sending the data from - a computer or another type of serial device?

What (in very general terms) is the data that you are sending via the "digi one" and what is its destination?

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