Stranded in Internet blackspot.Wireless an option?

  SharonLD72 18:58 02 May 06
Locked

I recently moved into a flatshare and took my trusty laptop which had connections aplenty at my previous place even with no intenet connection in the actual house.
At the new place...NOTHING. As far as I can see there is only one phone line at the new flat and I think one person uses this for her own internet connection. Is there some way of piggybacking from hers without awkward wires/getting people in to install another connection and without causing any inconvenience/expense to her.
I'm new to all this networking malarky and have no clue at all. I suspect she's using OneTel but I don't see her much so who knows.
Any feedback would be appreciated because I'm fed up with crowded internet cafes when I have a perfectly good laptop at home.

  ade.h 19:06 02 May 06

I apologise in advance if I have misinterpreted your post, but are you actually saying that you have previously used other people's wireless networks? You certainly seem to be claiming that you would do so now if any were available in your new location. THIS IS ILLEGAL.

  SharonLD72 19:12 02 May 06

Oh blimey. Really?! This is exactly my point...I'm clueless. What I want to find out though is if there's anyway I can make some sort of wireless connection from my flatmate's broadband...with her prmission and all above board?

  ade.h 19:28 02 May 06

No not really, though for different reasons. Her ISP would not appreaciate her sharing her service with someone else, and could cut her off if they became aware of it, so it might not be wise to risk it.

The practice of using wireless networks without permission is known as piggybacking (if in the same building) or wardriving (if you're parked outside) and has resulted in prosecutions.

  dms05 16:34 03 May 06

ade.h - if SharonLD72 is a resident in the flat I can't see an ISP complaining if she uses the flats only possible ADSL connection. So what does SharonLD72 need to achieve this? It depends upon the equipment currently used. If it's just a plain USB Modem thats different to a Router. If the other person isn't there very often perhaps SharonLD72 can simply plug her laptop into the existing equipment? We need to know more about the current installation.

And ade.h is 100% correct about stealing other poeple's WiFi bandwidth. It's just that. But people do it.

  ade.h 17:07 03 May 06

As the FE often states, it is against the T&C of most ISPs to share your internet connection with someone else without the ISP's permission, or to sell some of your bandwidth. I'm sure some people would say "oh, how will it know?" but that's missing the point.

What is not clear to me at this stage is the exact nature of the thread orgininator's living situation; is it just one flat that the two parties share? Is it a converted house (rooms or maisonettes, etc)? Obviously, this influences the legal/T&C situation.

*IF* it proves to be possible - from that standpoint - to share the pre-existing ADSL service, then a router would be required unless both parties agree to use the internet at different times and switch their ADSL modems off inbetween. As I understand it, two ADSL modems cannot satisfactorily share a single ADSL line as they will contend with one another. This has, of course, no relation to the contention between different ADSL lines, which is handled by the exchange in much the same way as a router, but on a much larger scale.

Depending on your domestic arrangements, if you share the same phone line/number and the same address, then the ISP may well have no qualms about you sharing the ADSL service. If you are not at the same address (such as a block of flats) then that presents a different situation entirely. I suggest you contact the ISP to find out what it will permit.

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